Begin forwarded message:

From: John Celona <jcelona@sbcglobal.net>
Date: July 8, 2012 2:23:58 PM PDT
To: NuggetRx@pca-ggr.org



Begin forwarded message:

From: John Celona <nugget-ed@sbcglobal.net>
Subject: From Porsche Club of America--Golden Gate Region
Date: December 30, 2007 4:41:55 PM PST

New YearGGR Logo
Porsche Club of America
Golden Gate Region




January, 2008 - Vol 48, Number 1
In This Issue
President's Message
Letter from the Editor
Competition Corner
Membership Report
Board of Directors
Around the Zone
Drivers' Ed #6
The Power Chef
40 Years Ago in the Nugget
Year End GGR Banquet
Zone 7 Awards Dinner
2008 DE Schedule
Crab 34
European Porsche Parade 2008
LA Lit & Toy Show
Condolences for Ron Leppke
Quick Links
Dear Porsche Enthusiast,

Welcome to The Nugget, the email newsletter of the Golden Gate Region, Porsche Club of America.
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If you have any trouble viewing this email, you can click here to go to the archive of PDF versions of this newsletter. For comments or feedback, click here to email the editor.

Thanks for reading.
Join Our Mailing List!
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President's Message
Bill Dally--by Bill Dally, GGR President

Happy New Year!  2008 is going to be a great year for the club.  There are five driver's education and time trial events already on the calendar, and the autocross series is shaping up with a return to Alameda and eight events tentatively scheduled.   There are also numerous social events. 

Only one ingredient is needed to make these events a success: participation.  Events are only a success when you, the members, show up and make them a success.  Our driving events are fun for two reasons.  First, there are few things that will put a bigger smile on your face than driving a Porsche the way it was meant to be driven.  Whether it is a well executed lap of Thunderhill or a perfect run through an autocross course, performance driving is a mind and body exercise that gets your adrenaline pumping and leaves you with a sense of satisfaction when its done well.

Second, what is even more fun than driving your car at its limits is sharing the experience with other people who share your passion.  The people in our club are fantastic and the social aspects of a driving event are as much fun as the driving itself.  Whether its discussing the right line through a tricky autocross course, the merits of left-foot braking, or lamenting the condition of the surface at Candlestick, sharing adds to the experience.  Socializing is fun in its own right and also makes the driving itself more enjoyable.

For those of you who are already regular participants, I'll look forward to seeing you at an upcoming event.  For those of you who haven't come to an event recently, what are you waiting for?  Come to an autocross.  Its fun, low cost, almost zero risk, and a great way to get started.

I often meet people driving Porsches who I don't see at our events and I encourage them to come out.  While many come, many others give excuses why they don't.  Here are some of the most common excuses - and why they don't hold water.

Excuse 1:  "It might hurt my car."
Rebuttal:  While nothing is zero risk, autocross is about as close as it gets.  In a well-run autocross, the course is set up well away from stationary obstacles and parked cars, and cars are red-flagged if they get too close together on the course.  As long as you put your foot on the brake when you spin, you can drive your car at the limits of adhesion - and occasionally beyond - with almost zero risk at an autocross.  About the worst that typically happens is that you will hit an orange traffic pylon (aka cone) which will leave a small black scuff mark that can easily be removed with a bit of polishing.

Excuse 2:  "I won't know what I'm doing."
Rebuttal:  You don't need any prior experience, ground school, or home study before coming to an autocross.  All you need is a Porsche.  All first-timers are assigned a friendly instructor to show them the ropes.   Your instructor will walk you through how the event is run - work assignments, course walks, run groups, etc... as well as point out the basics of performance driving: line, speed, and rhythm.

Excuse 3:  "I don't have enough time."
Rebuttal:  Attending an autocross requires only a modest commitment of time.  You could attend just a morning - from 8AM to Noon, just an afternoon - from 11:30AM to 4PM, or all day, from 8AM to 4PM.  You have 168 hours every week to spend on things, spending 4 hours at an autocross can surely be fit in.

Excuse 4:  "I won't know anyone there."
Rebuttal:  You will after about the first five minutes.  In fact one of the best reasons to come to an event is to meet new people.  The folks in the club are very friendly, welcoming, and all around good people to get to know.  Folks in the club are also a very diverse crowd.  Drivers at a recent event included both men and women with ages ranging from 18 to 70-something.

So, as you see, there really aren't any reasons not to come out to an autocross.  I will expect to see all of you at one this season.

One excuse that I didn't mention above is, "you aren't putting on the type of event that I want."  This also can be addressed, but to do so, we need to know what type of event you would like:  a casual drive in the hills - perhaps to a nice restaurant, a tour to a scenic location or interesting museum, a tech session on engine rebuilding, etc...  If there is sufficient interest, anything is possible.  If you have ideas for new types of events, please send them to ggrpresident@gmail.com.  Of course, being an all-volunteer organization, someone - most likely from among the people who suggested the event - will need to step forward to organize the event - and that's also fun.

The club is here to serve the members.  To do this we need to know what members like, what they don't like, and what new things we should be doing.  Please let us know.

Bill
Jerry WoodsSmart Racing
Letter from the Editor
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--by John Celona, Nugget Editor

A New Year

Welcome to the first issue of The Nugget for 2008. This marks the end of our first full year of publishing The Nugget via email and PDF. As you may have noticed, 2007 was the first year in recent memory that 12 issues of The Nugget were published: one each month. The former print schedule was for 10 issues each year. Hopefully, the combination of more regular issues and more complete and current coverage of club events are welcome changes for the readers.

Also, readers may have noticed that there's a link at the very end of The Nugget each month which says "Forward Email." Using this link, you can forward a complete copy of The Nugget to anyone you like. The advantage of using this link instead of the usual forward command in your email program is it ensures the recipients receive a complete and intact copy. Email client programs (as they're called) often make changes and deletions to email contents when forwarding them. Using this link avoids these problems.

Also, there's a button at the very top of The Nugget which says "Join our List!" By clicking this button, anyone you forward a Nugget to can add their name to the distribution list and receive their own copy each month. Subscriptions to The Nugget are free (until there's some reason to change that!). Each month, I receive notices that folks have availed themselves of this option. Unless these folks have 'fessed up their names (which is optional), I don't really know who these new additions are--but I'm hopeful at least some of you are deciding to join the fun by joining PCA. Clicking on the PCA logo at the top of The Nugget will get you to the PCA web site where you can join on the spot.

Do give that at least a passing thought. Cost is only $42 per year, you'll receive PCA's award-winning Panorama magazine (in the mail!) in addition to The Nugget--and you'll discover that receiving these publications is only the start of the fun.

As always, thanks for reading.

John
CommCovRennwerks
Competition Corner
Thompson--by Dan Thompson, Competition Director

Rules Changes for Seats and Harnesses

OK, race fans.  Here is the biggest bone of contention for 2008.

Due to recommendations from PCA National DE Minimum Safety Standards, we have had to modify our past rules concerning seats and harnesses.  Please read the following passage carefully.  Especially the last paragraph.  It will effect folks that plan on running the Time Trial series in 2008.  Make sure your car will be able to pass tech in regard to seats/belts/harnesses.

The rest of the rule changes will be listed online shortly.  Most of the rules changes for 2008 were points values for various modifications, like wheel widths, tire wear ratings etc.  Please stop at the GGR Points classification site and check your car's points.  Your car may have changed classes for 2008.  If you aren't sure, edit or reclass your car to make sure of your correct class for 2008

Harness Systems: If the participant chooses to install a 5 or 6 point driving harness ( four point systems are not safe and therefore not allowed) several changes to the automobile must be made to create a safe occupant restraint system. Harnessesmust include a antisubmarine strap and be mounted in an approved manner consistent the manufacturer's instructions. The Harness system must be used in conjunction with a seat which has the supplied routing holes for the shoulder and anti-submarine belts. All pieces of the restraint system must be installed in accordance with the manufacturer's instructions.

This means that a seat is required to have the proper routing holes for the harness as supplied by the seat manufacturer for the shoulder and anti-submarine straps. The shoulder straps should be mounted at 90 degrees to the axis of your spine or at most 40 degrees down from horizontal. Because the addition of the harness system means that the occupants are fastened upright in the vehicle, a properly padded roll bar or roll cage is strongly encouraged to complete the SYSTEM. The use of one without the other may result in an unsafe environment and is not a COMPLETE SYSTEM. Due to UV degradation and wear the harness webbing must be replaced every five years.

Cars with driver and passenger air bags will be allowed to participate in DE while using stock 3 point belts and stock seats. Cars participating in Time Trial will be required to have the aforementioned 5-6 points harnesses and the appropriate seats.  The use of a 5-6 points harness system will negate the usage of a stock style seat.  Any car that does not have a driver and passenger air bag and 3 point belts will be required to have 5-6 point harnesses and appropriate seat for DE or TT.

Dan
Membership Report
Jeff Kost

Due to the risk of spilling olive oil and contaminating the Bay, it was not possible to present a membership report at the December board meeting. Jeff will be back with a membership report next month.  --Ed.
Board of Directors
Mercier--by Laura Mercier, Secretary

Joint Board Dinner
December 7, 2007

A. Call To Order

The meeting came to order at 8:05 p.m. at Sapore Italiano Restaurant in Burlingame. The occasion was GGR's annual joint dinner for the present year's and next year's Board of Directors and significant others.

Board members present were Claude Leglise (president), Bob Murillo (VP), Dan Thompson (competition), Bill Benz (past president),  Jeff Kost (membership), Mark Powell (social), Tracey Morris (treasurer), and John Celona (Nugget editor). Laura Mercier (secretary) was absent.

Also present were Larry & Linda Adams (concours chair), Larry & KC Sharp (Zone 7 rep), Andrew Forest (TT chair), Gary Willard (sponsorship director), Susan Angebranndt (webmaster), and significant others Harold Williams, Sharon Dally, Cindy Salisbury, Joanne Thompson, Hayden Morris, Bubba Gong, and Ruth Benz
   
Agenda Changes
None

B. Approval Of Minutes

Minutes from the Board of Directors Meeting November 14, 2007 was previously approved via an email vote.

C. Welcome, Award, and Thanks

President Claude Leglise welcomed new board member Bill Dally. He thanked the 2007 board members for their service to the club and presented them with an inexpensive but tasteful token consisting of a small model 356 Porsche attached to an oak base.

The president also presented Susan Angebranndt with a special commemorative award to thank her for her seven years of service to the club as webmaster.

D. Financial Report

The president reported that, after the payment of year-end bills, the club will be in approximately the same financial position as of two years ago. The club has now replenished the reserves which were drawn down in 2006.

E. Autocross Venues

With the loss of Alameda as an autocross site, followed by Candlestick Park repaving with pavement unsuitable for autocross, the need for an autocross site has become acute. Although Marina is an excellent site in terms of cost and surface, its distance from the Bay Area makes it inconvenient for many members.

Accordingly, at the direction of the Board, Board members have been in discussions with SCCA, which is seeking a long-term autocross venue in the Bay Area. Members may recall that GGR participated with SCCA in the construction of Thunderhill Raceway Park, as result of which was GGR's 30-year contract for access to track dates at Thunderhill.

The President recommended that the new board take up at the January meeting the matter of whether the club should commit to setting aside funds to obtain long-term access to the prospective SCCA autocross site.
 
Items For Next Board Meeting in January, 2008.
  1. Participation with SCCA in acquiring long-term access to an autocross site.
Adjournment

There being no further business to come before the Board, a motion to adjourn approved at 8:30 PM. The next Board of Directors meeting is set for January, 2008, at a time and place to be determined.   Please email the President Bill Dally to add items to the agenda.

Respectfully submitted,
Laura Mercier
GGR Secretary 2007
Around the Zone

Larry Sharp--by Larry Sharp, Zone 7 Rep

I am starting my fourth year as Zone 7 Rep in January. It seems that the last three years have passed faster than ever for me. I guess keeping busy makes time fly. The next big event is the annual Zone 7 Party on Jan 19th. The ads have been out for awhile so please see your local Region's newsletter or website for the details. We have a special guest attending; Kurt Gibson PCA National Vice President has agreed to attend our dinner and Presidents meeting.

Now if snoozing with our National Leader isn't enough to get you to attend then please come help celebrate two special people. First we have Paul Christensen Sierra Nevada Region being put on the Zone 7 Wall of Fame. We also have Terry Zaccone receiving the Zone 7 Lifetime achievement award. If you know or have met these two fine members of Zone 7 you know how well deserved it is. Please come out and help them maybe shed a tear or two. The very next day on January 20th, Diablo Region is putting on a DE Instructor school run by the National DE Chairman Pete Tremper. The event ad is on their Regions Website.

Being Zone rep takes a lot of time, and especially a lot of help. I want to let you know that Larry Adams, Rik Larson, and Susan Angebrandt have all agreed to continue helping me as Zone 7 Autocross, Rally, and webmaster respectively. The New Person to step forward is Mark Gersh who will be our next Zone 7 Concours chairman. Thanks for helping out guys and girl... I can't do it with out you.

I hope everyone who has participated in our Zone events come out to receive their due rewards and trophies at the Zone dinner. It is the best feeling to receive such honors in front of your peers.

See you on the road
Larry
DE#6: Laguna Seca
--by the Editor

For the first time in years, the ever-booked folks at Laguna Seca coughed up a date for GGR: Sunday, December 9. Time Trial and Drivers' Ed chair Andrew Forrest limited entrants to folks who'd previously driven with GGR in the hopes no one would contact any of Laguna's many hard objects.

Chris DePuy
Chris DePuy

As it turned out, the participants were in fact treated to a beautiful, sunny, dry, and incident-free day on the famous track. Winged and track-dedicated machines shared the road with a number of newer, absolutely dealer-stock vehicles--all being driven as Porsches are meant to be driven.
Robert Harley
Robert Harley

With only one day available, driving was limited to the Drivers' Ed format (no timed runs). Many drivers made the run down to Monterey early Sunday morning, arriving for the 7:30 a.m. tech inspection, then heading back afterwards. As Andrew commented afterwards, "If we tried anything like this in Canada, the caribou would get in the way."

91db
"dB, or not dB. That is the question."

Reports of cheering spectators exceeding Laguna's strictly-enforced sound limits are utterly unfounded.

More photos are available by David Leong.
The Power Chef
NE Bike
The Fiesta Taco

--by John Celona, The Power Chef

I hope that your holidays social calendar has been as packed with events as mine has, and that your fridge is likewise as well-stocked with the remains--some of it still excellent a day or two afterwards (the stuffed olives), and others a little less spunky (the proscuitto-wrapped melon).

So, whether you're in the mood for what's in the fridge or not, what you're probably not in the mood for is a major cooking undertaking. I feel the same way. So I've been surveying what's lodged in the various chilled drawers and compartments for fresh things I can fashion from what's already around.

That was the genesis of the Fiesta Taco: it tastes so good you'd think you've thrown yourself a party, but it comes together fresh and delicious with just a few things on hand. Some guacamole, salsa fresca, boneless chicken breasts, corn tacos, onions, and a few spices is all it took. Those were all sitting in my fridge looking for something to do, but you could just as well purchase them at the store. Most grocery stores have a pretty well-stocked assortment of those foods these days. I'll save my own recipes for guacamole and salsa fresca for another day to keep this a genuine 15-minutes start-to-eat recipe--even if you don't rehearse it as I still suspect Rachel Ray must do.

This makes a meal for two, but could easily be increased to feed more.

The Fiesta Taco

Fiesta Taco

The Gist

Saute together marinated, chopped chicken breast and onions. Spoon on corn tortillas warmed in the microwave and top with salsa fresca and guacamole.

Ingredients

2 boneless chicken breasts
1/2 tsp. salt
1/2 tsp. fresh ground black pepper
1/2 tsp. granulated garlic
1/2 tsp. chili powder
1/2 tsp. chilpotle chili powder
1 yellow onion, chopped
1 Tb. extra virgin olive oil
12 corn tortillas
salsa fresca
guacamole

Method

Chop the chicken breasts into bite-sized pieces, then toss together with the salt, pepper, garlic, chili and chilpotle chile powders. Set aside to marinate for a few minutes.

Place the tortillas on a plate, cover with a sheet of plastic wrap, then microwave for about a minute and a half to warm.

Heat a skillet with the olive oil over high heat. Add the onions and saute over high heat until the onions are browned (the pan will be getting very hot as you do this). Add the marinated chicken pieces and toss. Pour a few tablespoons of water in the pan (step back from the steam as you do this), and continue to toss for another minute. The water will pick up any spices or chicken that was sticking and quickly cook the chicken (for culinary types, this is called "deglazing" the pan). Shut the heat off. The heat remaining in the pan will finish cooking the chicken while still leaving it juicy, and keep it warm.

Warm the tortillas for another 30 seconds in the microwave if they've cooled.

Serve this right from the pan. Place a little chicken on a tortilla, then top with salsa and guacamole and enjoy. Delish!

Variations

If you like, sprinkle a little grated extra sharp cheddar on top of the chicken and tortilla, then top with salsa and guacamole.

Bon appetit,
The Power Chef
40 Years Ago in The Nugget: January 1968
--by Jim Bauman, Notorious ex-editor of The Nugget (presently at large)


Jan 40

January 1968!  Dwight Mitchell is GGR's president, and an "Instructional Practice Autocross" is scheduled for the Pleasanton Fairgrounds on January 14th. Cost to enter: $2.50!

The January Dinner meeting is scheduled to be held at the San Jose Hyatt, 101 and North First St.  Your $5 check gets you a French Pot Roast dinner!

Edward Bowman Jr. has the following advert in the classifieds:

Race ready ELVA PORSCHE. Excel. Cond. Carrera engines, 1500cc, 1700cc, 1800cc. New, rebuilt condition.

No price, but I bet even in 1968 it wasn't cheap. There were 19 Elva-Porsches made originally for the United States Road Racing Championship in the mid 1960s. The cars were built in England with special engines supplied by Porsche.  One sold in 2007 for $350K.

Also in the classifieds, Clifford Heselton is selling his 1959 Porsche 356 A 1500 GS Carrera GT with alloy doors and hoods, yada yada yada..  Ho hum.  No price here either. If you have to ask....

And finally, here is a great anecdote from a story about the "9th Porsche Weekend" held Nov. 24-26th, 1967.  "Wolfgang" is the roving reporter, and he included this in his article. It's great!

Now, you know that I'm supposed to be a nosy reporter, and let you know who was sleeping with whom - who got gorked, etc., but if I report all that, I wouldn't have room for this juicy bit of news.  It all started back in September at Squaw Valley. One of our noted members decided to drive back from the Labor Day weekend with his stinger muffler on his car. He got stopped by the CHP and ticketed for a noisy system. Time went by and he hadn't gotten the ticket signed - more time and a notice from the department said he had ten days to get if fixed.  More time and then it was Cotati and on the way back from the Saturday event to the motel what does he see but two cops! Can't get the first ticket signed off because he had the stinger back on the car, so real quick he pulls over and looks at a road map until they pass-Whew! Close! Now on the way to the Monterey Weekend coming thru the mountains he has a little dice with another sport in a T.R. all the while noticing the big headlights of some stupid guy in a Detroit Iron trying to catch them. Anyhow, they lost the D.I  and blipped into Carmel.  Sunday on the way to the autocross our hero was touring with his brother who was driving a VW. He noticed that said brother wasn't following so he turned around to find a CHP giving a ticket for a LOUD exhaust system on the VW. While we are here and stopped, now let's get the ticket signed off on the loud Porsche. We do so and while the CHP is checking, he looks at the license RJZ 586. Just a minute... that rings a bell... so CHP checks and sure enough that license was on the "Lookout for" list, having been reported by the "stupid guy in the D.I.."  "Let's see your license, hero!"

No, it doesn't stop here. But can you guess who our Hero is? --- Yep. Joe Reitmeir! To top it all off when Joe presented his license to friend cop, it had been expired for two months.  Net: signed off on loud muffler citation, a ticket for expired license and brother Ham's license was expired also-TWO YEARS (been in Viet Nam). Maybe this explains why Joe went off course on both his practice lap and 1st timed lap. Well he wound up ok for not only did he take first in the concours, but first in autocross, and first overall for the weekend. I still think he should get the permanent dumkopf award-like maybe a framed copy of the traffic tickets.

Does stuff like this happen any more in GGR?
2007 Year End GGR Banquet

Sunday January 13th, 2008, 10:00 AM to 2:30 PM, at the Blackhawk Museum

blackhawk1
The Blackhawk Automotive Galleries. Like no place you've ever experienced!


Located an hour southeast of San Francisco in Danville, California, the facility encompasses nearly 70,000 square feet with four exhibition galleries, an Automotive Reference Library & Museum Store, Special Events Area, Board Room and state-of-the-art catering kitchen.



Join your fellow GGR members to celebrate Porsches, our club and 2007 at the Blackhawk Museum in Danville. A fabulous buffet brunch will be served and there will be a no-host bar.

Cost is $40/person
In addition to a display of Member's Porsches on the Plaza, and docents to provide guided tours of the museum, we'll be giving out the Autocross and Time Trial Season Awards, as well as our yearly awards to outstanding club members. Plus, did we mention the Door Prizes?

Make check payable to PCA/GGR and mail to:

Mark Powell, PCA-GGR Social Director
P.O. Box 23038
San Jose, CA 95153-3038

Payment must be postmarked by December 31, 2007. Directions to the museum are available here. For further information, contact Mark Powell.

blackhawk2
Zone 7 Awards Dinner

Please come celebrate PCA's finest at our yearly Zone 7 Dinner: Saturday January 19, 2008 at the Flamingo Hotel in Santa Rosa.

zone 7
Awards for all series as well as special awards will be presented.

Our Special Guest will Be Kurt Gibson, PCA National Vice-President.

No Host Cocktails at 6:00 P.M.
Dinner at 7:00 P.M.

Larry Sharp, Zone 7 Rep

Where
The Flamingo Hotel is located at 2777 4th Street, Santa Rosa, CA 95405. The phone number is (707) 545-8530. There is a reduced room rate at the hotel before December 30 if you mention the Porsche Club.

Menu Choices
  1. Grilled Portabella Filled with Polenta, Steamed Green Beans & Carrots, Basque Tomato Sauce
  2. Stuffed Marinate Pork Loin with Dried Apricots and Cranberries, Slow Roasted, Jus Lier, Garlic Mashed Potatoes
Make a reservation
Cost: $55.00 per person before December 15, $60.00 per person after December 15

Please RSVP and send your check, payable to Larry Sharp PCA Zone 7, and your menu selection(s), to:
Larry Sharp
1119 Megan Road
Livermore, CA 94550
2008 Drivers' Ed & Time Trial Schedule
Following a very quiet and successful foray into the headquarters of the Drivers' Ed National Committee at the Watering Hole Taco Bar, we are very pleased to be able to bring you the ground school and Drivers' Ed schedule for 2008. Time to start marking your calendar, checking over your chariot, and shopping for sticky tires.

  Sat Jan 26, '08   Ground School Round Table Pizza, Concord

  Feb 16-17, '08   Driver's Ed & Time Trial #1 Infineon Raceway

  Sat Mar 29, '08   Ground School Round Table Pizza, Concord

  Apr 18-20, '08   Driver's Ed & Time Trial #2 Thunderhill

  Sat May 3, '08   Ground School Round Table Pizza, Concord

  May 24-25, '08   Driver's Ed & Time Trial #3 Buttonwillow

  Sat Jul 26, '08   Ground School Round Table Pizza, Concord

  Aug 16-17, '08   Driver's Ed & Time Trial #4 Thunderhill

  Sat Aug 30, '08   Ground School Round Table Pizza, Concord

  Sep 20-21, '08   Driver's Ed & Time Trial #5 Thunderhill

Crab 34
Crab34
European Porsche Parade 2008
--by Kathrin Brandstaetter, Porsche club coordinator

The European Parade of 2008 will take place in Sardinia from the 8th to 11th of May. This meeting for all Porsche Clubs worldwide, will take you to the extraordinarily beautiful Costa Smeralda. Highlights of the Porsche Parade 2008 include the Photo Rally "Mare e Terra" and the Concours d'Elégance in the "Marina Vecchia" at Porta Cervo. On the final evening there will be a farewell gala dinner in a magical environment along with the presentation of prizes.

Parade2
Real cobblestones. Not pavers from Home Depot.

More information about the Porsche Parade 2008 can be found in German, English and Italian under the following link.

We would like to announce that from today until the 31st of December 2008 you can register yourself for the European Porsche Parade 2008 online or via fax. Please be aware that there is a limitation of 250 cars.

Parade1
There are plenty of places to park your tush, too.

If you have further questions please contact the Federation of Italian Porsche Clubs. A special hotline has been prepared, which is accessible from Monday till Friday 4 p.m. till 8 p.m.

Tel. +39 040 7469500

We are looking forward to seeing you next year in Sardinia.

Best regards,
Your Team of worldwide Porsche Club Coordination

Dr. Ing. h.c. F.  Porsche Aktiengesellschaft
Sitz der Gesellschaft: Stuttgart
Registergericht: Amtsgericht Stuttgart HRB-Nr. 5211
Vorsitzender des Aufsichtsrats: Dr. Wolfgang Porsche
Vorstand: Dr.-Ing. Wendelin Wiedeking, Vorsitzender
Klaus Berning, Wolfgang Dürheimer, Thomas Edig, Holger P. Härter, Michael Macht

Die vorgenannten Angaben werden jeder E-Mail automatisch hinzugefügt. Dies ist kein Anerkenntnis,dass es sich beim Inhalt dieser E-Mail um eine rechtsverbindliche Erklärung der Porsche AG handelt.Erklärungen, die die Porsche AG verpflichten, bedürfen jeweils der Unterschrift durch zwei zeichnungs-berechtigte Personen der AG.
LA Lit & Toy Show
LA Lit and Toy Show
Toy Show

Now in its 25th year, over 1,200 people attend the annual Porsche and Vintage V-W Literature, Toy/Model, & Memorabilia Swap Meet at the Los Angeles Airport Hilton Hotel.  The meet has over 225 tables with tens of thousands of collectibles - posters, sales literature, toys, models, factory gift items, press kits,  technical literature, small trim items, and accessories for Porsches and vintage VW's.  The meet is held in two huge ballrooms on the main floor of the Airport Hilton, 5711 W. Century Blvd., Los Angeles - very close by Los Angeles International Airport.  The public is admitted at 9:00 a.m. for $5 each at the door.  "Earlybird" shoppers are admitted with the vendors at 7:30 a.m. for $25 at the door.  Special discounted room rates are available from the LA Airport Hilton directly at 310-410-4000.  Please ask for the special room rates under the promotional code "PCH."

For more information, go to the web site.

Contact by email: (Prescott Kelly, Jim Perrin or Wayne Callaway)
Contact by Phone: Wayne Callaway at 909-930-1999 (Work - weekdays 9am to 5pm Pacific time)
Condolences for Ron Leppke
--by the Editor

We would like to offer our condolences to the friends and family of Ron Leppke, who passed recently. Ron was a member of PCA for over 40 years and was a Charter member of the Diablo region. As any regular reader of The Nugget knows, Ron devoted a great deal of time to photographing GGR and Zone 7 events, and his photos were regularly featured. Ron is shown below doing what he loved best, on this occasion photographing the winners at GGR's annual Carlsen Concours charity fund raiser.

Leppke


Ron's company, spirit, and contributions to the club will be greatly missed.
That will do it for January. Hope to see you at the annual GGR banquet, which this year will be at the Blackhawk car museum on Sunday, January 13. If you haven't already, do send your check in and join us (see more info above). Checks need to be postmarked by December 31 (tomorrow!).

As always, thanks for reading.
John Celona
Porsche Club of America-Golden Gate Region
Porsche Club of America--Golden Gate Region | Nugget Headquarters | 505 Vista Ave | San Carlos | CA | 94070
Begin forwarded message:

From: John Celona <nugget-ed@sbcglobal.net>
Subject: From Porsche Club of America--Golden Gate Region
Date: January 31, 2008 3:46:03 PM PST

ValentineGGR Logo
Porsche Club of America
Golden Gate Region




February, 2008 - Vol 48, Number 2
In This Issue
President's Message
Letter from the Editor
Competition Corner
Nov. Membership
Dec. Membership
Board of Directors
GGR Award Winners
The Power Chef
40 Years Ago in the Nugget
Meet the New Webmaster
Porsche Roads
Vintage Racing Stories
Porsches Stars at Daytona
2008 DE Schedule
More on the Panamerica
GT3 is "Most Wanted"
Crab 34
European Porsche Parade 2008
LA Lit & Toy Show
Quick Links
Dear Porsche Enthusiast,

Welcome to The Nugget, the email newsletter of the Golden Gate Region, Porsche Club of America.
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If you have any trouble viewing this email, you can click here to go to the archive of PDF versions of this newsletter. For comments or feedback, click here to email the editor.

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Pawlina Paraskova CG
Executive Editor of The Nugget
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President's Message
Bill Dally--by Bill Dally, GGR President

February marks the end of our off-season as we kick off our DE and Time Trial series with an event at Infineon (formerly known as Sears Point) on February 16th and 17th.  For those who autocross, you have another month to wait before we kick off the 2008 season with our return to Alameda on March 15.  We will be running on a new (and larger) site at Alameda, so don't miss this event.

The off-season can be a frustrating time for those of us who are driving enthusiasts.  We are itching to get behind the wheel and compete.  Whether you have another two weeks to wait for the Time Trial or another six before the autocross, here are some ideas on how to fill the time:
  • Prepare your car.  The off-season is an ideal time to get your car in perfect shape for the season.  After taking care of routine maintenance and making sure you comply safety guidelines (check the dates on your helmet and belts) you can study the recent rules changes to see if you have any points left to use on upgrades while staying within your class.  The new rules for tires may also open up some options.  I have spent some time on this one already this winter.  My white 914/6 has new springs and torsion bars that should help keep all four wheels on the ground - unlike its debut performance at Marina in November.
  • Practice looking ahead.  Your eyes are the most important part of your body when you are driving and where you look as more effect on the line you take than almost anything else.  Many beginning drivers have apex fixation in which they focus on the apex of a turn until they are past it. Only then do they look up toward the exit - almost always finding that they are not on the right line.  A much smoother line results when you always look one or two features ahead.  Once you turn in look to the exit - and possibly to the next turn - and let your peripheral vision deal with the apex.   By looking ahead your brain computes a smooth line connecting your present position, the features you've already seen, and your current viewpoint.  You can practice this in everyday driving by constantly looking ahead - but please don't hit any parked cars or pedestrians.
You can take this practice one step further by practicing picking and driving the right line in everyday traffic.  It's a good idea to leave a few extra feet of space when doing this to avoid ruining a rim on a curb. Also, make sure you don't sideswipe any cars on the freeway while hitting that late apex.  If, after practicing your line for a while, you find yourself thinking about turn-in points with the grocery cart at Safeway, its clearly time to get back on the track.
  • Adopt a project car.  Almost as much fun as driving a Porsche is returning an old car to life - and, with adequate garage space, this is a pleasure that can be enjoyed on a rainy winter day.  If you are at all mechanically inclined, rebuilding the engine, transmission, brakes, and other systems on an old car is very therapeutic after dealing with the more abstract challenges of Silicon Valley.
The club is currently reviewing the rules for time trial safety equipment.  Our current rules require 5-point harnesses for time trial (3-point street belts are adequate for driver education track events).  A recent revision to the rules also requires that the shoulder harnesses of 5-point belts pass through the seats.  This requires replacing the stock seats on almost all cars - even modern cars with airbags that are quite safe with their street belts - to make them eligible for time trial.  This rule creates a major deterrent that may discourage drivers from participating in time trials with street cars.  We are reviewing a proposal to permit modern cars with airbags to run in time trial events with stock seats and belts.  We hope to be able to report back on the results of this proposal soon.  Please stay tuned.

Losing access to the Alameda autocross site last year and having Candlestick repaved with a difficult surface has made it clear that getting access to a good autocross site a reasonable distance from the peninsula is a major challenge for the club which will only going to get more difficult with time.  Last year we managed to piece a season together by finding a new site, Bay Meadows, and by finishing the year with several events at Marina.  However, Bay Meadows is available for at most a few events each year, and attendance figures make it clear that most members don't want to drive all the way to Marina for an autocross.  We are fortunate to have been granted a permit to return to Alameda for events this year, but it is not clear how much longer we will be able to use that site.

Autocross is a central element of our driving program - both in its own right and as a feeder to our time trial program.  To ensure that we have a good, safe, local site for autocross in the long term, the club is looking at acquiring a permanent autocross site.  This will most likely involve not purchasing a piece of land, but rather acquiring the rights to use an existing parking lot or other facility for some number of weekend days per year.  Because the local chapter of the SCCA has similar issues, we are in contact with them and will likely work together on this issue. 

I would like to thank all of you who replied to last month's column by putting forth suggestions for new events and types of events.  I am hopeful that some of these proposals will come to fruition and some new tech sessions, social events, and/or tours will result.  It's not too late to propose something.  If you have a good idea for an event, please contact me or another board member and we will work with you to make it a reality.  Putting together an event is a great way to get involved with the club and meet a lot of great people.

Bill
Jerry WoodsSmart Racing
Letter from the Editor
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--by John Celona, Nugget Editor

The Green, Green Nugget

Unless you've just returned from five years cast away on a small island, you've heard a lot about "going green." Green businesses, green construction, green energy, green cars-just about every field of human endeavor is feeling the social pressure to get greener. I was at a planning session for the little town of San Carlos and it was a great concern to the gathered citizens that the town figure getting greener into its development plans. Especially with global warming, oil at historic highs, and billions of dollars going overseas to pay for it, this is not a good time for conspicuous consumption of energy or resources.

Possibly no one has raised the matter with you (yet), but it wouldn't be too surprising in this climate for someone to question the environmental friendliness of driving powerful, gas-guzzling cars in circles at maximum throttle or brake. For fun. Autocross or Drivers' Ed, in other words.

Thankfully, if you are ever accosted on this topic, you have a ready answer: the email Nugget. The email Nugget is GGR's "save the trees" contribution to the forest, to reducing its carbon footprint, and not least of all to Mother Earth.

As good as it was to have something pretty and printed arrive in the mail each month, each printed issue of the Nugget required approximately 500 pounds of paper. For ten printed issues (the former schedule, versus the email comes every month), that's 5000 pounds of paper each year. 2.5 tons. As quoted by Conservatree, that's about 38 trees per year which no longer need to be cut down to produce paper for the Nugget. And that's not even counting the energy used to produce the paper, the ink, the staples, and the fossil fuels burned to move all that paper around from the paper mill to the printer to the post office and finally to your home.

Put another way, with 9 autocrosses and 4 drivers' ed each year, for each event there about 3 more trees per event in existence than otherwise would be. Sounds pretty green to me.

But the email Nugget is also very green in another way perhaps more immediately near and dear to the club than future climate hypotheticals: it is very green in the sense of good old greenbacks.

Even after a lot of work to get production costs down (changing printers, changing layout and paper size, etc.), the printed Nugget still required $4,000 each month to print and mail. Advertising contributed about $1,000 of that-leaving a $3,000 hole the club had to deal with each month. $30,000 per year. Basically, the printed Nugget ate all of the portion of your annual PCA dues sent back to GGR, plus the autocross and time trial series each had to chip in an additional $5,000 or so to close the gap.

Prior to Andrew Forrest's remarkable efforts to turn around time trial attendance (this year's Perc Bliss award winner!), the cost of the printed Nugget was driving the club off the track.

You've already experienced the benefits of this if you've done an autocross recently. Cost was slated to go to $35 per event; it was kept at $30. The reason for this was the money saved with the email Nugget.

Two other benefits coming to the autocross folks from the email Nugget. First, the board has approved purchasing new timing equipment for autocross. No more stopping the event cold while folks try to figure out what went wrong with the aging pieces of equipment and their homemade connecting wires.

Second, the board has approved setting aside funds to participate with SCCA in gaining long-term access to an autocross site in the Bay Area-analogous to the way GGR's long-term contract with Thunderhill anchors the time trial series. With autocross sites becoming harder and harder to come by (there was no Alameda last year, and no Candlestick this year), this access is critical for the continued health of the autocross series, which in turn feeds participation in drivers' ed and time trials.

The green, green email Nugget. Next time you open one in your email, just think: somewhere out there, a few more trees are waving back at you.

As always, thanks for reading.

John
CommCovRennwerks
Competition Corner
Thompson--by Dan Thompson, Competition Director

Ready for the Season's Kickoff

OK sports fans, the 2008 GGR competition season is just about upon us. Our first event will be at Infineon Raceway. February 16 and 17. This venue is close for all of GGR so come out and see some Porsches in action on the track. Visitors and spectators are always welcome. This will be Time Trial #1, and we are hoping to finally get some times into the records for this track...Our 4th time will hopefully be the charm and keep the rain away for timed runs.

Our first AX of the season will be held at our old stomping grounds at Alameda. This year we will be using one of the runways instead of the tie down area we used to use. It is on the North East portion of the old airfield. This will be on March 15. Come on out and use that Porsche the way it was meant to be used.

A big thank you to Mark Blatt for securing the use of Alameda once again. He went to a lot of time and effort to make this happen. If you see him at one of our events, make sure you go up and thank him.

The runway we will be using this year will present some special issues for us. The runway is 4,500' long by just 200' wide. So our courses will tend to be long and narrow.

Hopefully, we will be getting some new timing equipment for the AX series this year and we are planning on going wireless with results immediately downloaded onto a laptop. Results should come pretty quickly with a new system.

On another subject. There has been some confusion and consternation about the seats/belts/harnesses needed for our DE/TT series. We are hoping to have much of this ironed out very soon. I know the sooner the better, and I agree. Keep an eye on the GGR website for Technical Bulletins issued about this subject, probably soon after the February Board meeting.

I also want to take this opportunity to give a big THANK YOU, to Chet and Lyn Martin for their years of service as track officials for the GGR Time Trial Series. For the past several years they have made the trip down from Vancouver Washington in their motorhome for each of our Time Trials. Without dedication like theirs, our events would never happen. Also a thank you to Sergio Meza for his service as Grid Steward last season.

On a related note our Time Trial Co-chairs for the 2009 season have been publicly announced.....it is a couple of veterans of the series. Mike Cullinan and Warren Walker. I am sure they will continue to grow the series as our current Chair, Andrew Forrest, has over the last 3 seasons.

Alright, the schedules for the AX and TT series are available to everyone on the GGR website so there are no excuses not to get out and try one of our events.

Dan
November Membership Report
Jeff Kost--by Jeff Kost, Membership Director

Total Members:     2488
Primary:               1485
Affiliate:               1002
Life:                          1

New Members:     27
Transfers In:          8
Transfers Out:       9

New Members

Vincent Castro

San Francisco

2008 Cayman

Bennett Chin

Los Altos

1995 911

Alec Clark

St Helena

 

Marina Collins

San Francisco

 

Terence Collins

San Francisco

1979 911

Dirk & Kim Diefendorf

San Mateo

2006 997

Pamela Dillon Beck

Soquel

 

Steven & Kristen Doherty

Menlo Park

1997 993 C4s

Blake Feinstein

Santa Clara

1979 911sc

Alexis Fox

Walnut Creek

 

Sara Garcia

San Jose

 

Rainer Genschel

San Francisco

1991 911 C4

Leslie & Gillian Hamilton

Palo Alto

2006 Cayenne S

Iling Ho

Burlingame

 

Donald & Shannon Hopkins

Millbrae

2005 997

Cirilo & Teresita Jaculina

Gilroy

2006 Carrera

Leonard & Carol Kwiatkowski

San Jose

2001 Boxster

Sean Maccann

Ireland

1989 911

Michal Mermelstein

San Francisco

 

Christian & Nancy Miller

Saratoga

2005

Lee Neidle

San Mateo

2008 Boxster S

Mark Otto

San Jose

2006 Cayman S

Edward Phillips

Menlo Park

1984 911

Robert Poltz

Mountain View

1999 911

Eileen Prager

Hillsborough

 

Lars Rossen

Palo Alto

2000 Boxster

Judith Rowe

Walnut Creek

 

Carey Shaughnessy

San Francisco

1992

Yao-Lin Tang

Burlingame

2001 911

Paul Tonelli

Menlo Park

2004 911

Marsha Tse

San Francisco

2001 996 Turbo

John Turner

East Perth

2000 Boxster S

Wilma & Frank Vanson

San Mateo

1982 911

Anthony Ward

Mill Valley

2000 Cup Gt3

Andrey Yruski

San Francisco

2008 Boxster S

Dietmar & Hollyjean Zapf

Emerald Hills

2007 911 Turbo

 
Anniversaries
30 Years

Peg Goerges

San Jose

 

Phillip Whalen

Woodside

1963 356-C

 
25 Years

Steve Moore

Los Altos Hills

1961 356

 
20 Years

James Calzia

Sunnyvale

1973 911

Victoria Wolf

Napa

 

 
15 Years

Ken Holladay

Gilroy

1973 914-4

Georg Konradsheim

Vosendorf

1973 911

Robert Sasaki

Fremont

1995 993

Jeffrey Williams

Aptos

1992 968

 
10 Years

Stanley Chang

San Francisco

1989 951

Amy Dodge Hammer

San Jose

 

John Gingrich

San Ramon

1993 911

Reg Johnston

Bowral, Nsw

2004 Cayenne T

Chip Virnig

Monte Seveno

 

 
5 Years

Edward Ishizaki

Pacifica

1986 Carerra

Catalina Mendez

Menlo Park

 

Konstantin Ovodov

San Francisco

2003 911/996

Patricia Pascoe

Hillsborough

 

Maria Paterno

Santa Clara

 

Fred Prager

Hillsborough

1997 Carrera

Susie Sutton

Menlo Park

 

Tom Sutton

Menlo Park

1998 Boxster

Joann Thompson

Burlingame

 

Wayne Vannorsdall

Walnut Creek

1995 993

Richard Pierce

San Francisco

2001 Carrera

Tony Riley

San Francisco

1999 996 Cabrio

Bridget Steele

Mountain View

 
 

December Membership Report
--by Jeff Kost, Membership DirectorJeff Kost

Total Members:   2519
Primary:             1472
Affiliate:             1046
Life:                        1

New Members:     10
Transfers In:          4
Transfers Out:       7


New Members

Roland Burton

Stanford

2007 987

Calvin & Michelle Eng

San Francisco

2002 911

Ted & Nancy Fischer

Los Gatos

2004 Boxster

Traci Gardner

Morgan Hill

 

Daniel Hernandez

San Jose

 

Thomas Huot

San Francisco

2006 Cayman S

Kristen Hurlbut

San Jose

 

Isabell Jaeger

Redwood City

 

Mike Lyons

San Francisco

 

Jack & Judy Millerick

Los Gatos

2002 Boxster

Mark Nelson

Incline Village

2004 Cayenne

Christopher Osborn

Berkeley

1984 911

Ron & Steven Pankowski

San Mateo

2008 911

Kai Petzelt

Redwood City

2007 Boxster

Dean Rizzi

San Francisco

2006 997

Tom Youdbulis

South San Francisco

 

 
Anniversaries
40 Years

James Fleming

Phoenix

1959 356

Ronald Olive

Portola Valley

2004 Cayenne

 
25 Years

Charles Arolla

Santa Clara

1973 911t

Kathi Hammill

Saratoga

 

 
20 Years

Scott Calzia

Sunnyvale

 

Keith Kambies

Mountain View

1987 944

 
15 Years

Geoffrey Alexander

San Jose

1977 930

Monica David

Sunnyvale

 

Gene Kindred

Morgan Hill

1962 356b

Brian Barrington

Stinson Beach

 

Judith Williams

Aptos

 

 
10 Years

Christine Currie

San Ramon

 

Christine Johnston

Bowral Nsw

 

Karen Lyter Shahoian

Petaluma

 

Jt Thompson

Morgan Hill

1975 Carrera

Gerald Char

San Francisco

1988 951

Skipp Harvey

San Jose

1979 911

Ronald Wilcox

Soquel

1979 911

 
5 Years

Patricia Burrow

San Jose

 

Linda Clark

San Francisco

1996 911

Brad Hansen

San Carlos

2002 Turbo

Robert Hilton

Pleasanton

2001 Boxster S

Floran Kepic

Pacifica

2002 Boxster

Kelly Maddox

Walnut Creek

 

Andy Mayhew

Redwood City

1984 911

Dean Meniktas

Moraga

1984 911

David Minor

Tiburon

2003 Boxster

Jason Peacock

Bolinas

 

David Ferlauto

San Jose

1969 912 Coupe

Vincent Marino

San Jose

2004 Cayenne S

Audrey Pierce

San Francisco

 

Jim Tabor

Pacifica

1973 914s

Karen Warolin

San Francisco

 


Board of Directors
Celona--by John Celona, Secretary

GGR Board Meeting Minutes
1/9/2008

Call to Order

The meeting was called to order at 6:50 p.m. at the house of the president, Bill Dally. Present were Bill Dally, Dan Thompson, Claude Leglise, Andrew Forrest, Mark Powell, Tracey Morris, John Celona, Carl Switzer, Larry Adams, Bill Benz, and Bob Murillo. Jeff Kost was absent.

Call for agenda changes: none
Call for calendar changes: none

Minutes of the December meeting were approved.

Postmortem of events
Laguna Seca track day was sunny and there were lots of smiles.
The Friday night social saw a sparse turnout.

Approval of 2008 Budgets
Autocross Budget was approved. The fee for autocross will remain $30, with budgets aiming to break even for the entire year.
Time Trial Budget was approved. The schedule is for 5 events this year. Check the web site for details.

Directors' Reports

President: nothing to report. 

Vice-President:
  • Event Chairs need to confirm with VP their event schedules so insurance can be ordered.
  • President to determine attendees at Zone 7 Presidents Meeting.
Upcoming event status report:
  • 1/18/08 Harry's Social   
  • 1/19 Zone 7 Presidents Meeting and Awards Dinner 
  • 1/26 GGR Ground School
  • 2/2 Boxster Brunch 10am at Alice's Restaurant
Certificates are ordered for the following events:
  • DE/TT # 1 Infineon
Certificates are in place for the following events:
  • Blackhawk Awards Dinner 1/13/08
Treasurer: went officially on record to thank Tracey for her help with the transition.

Secretary: confirmed that meeting minutes will go out immediately after the meeting, with changes then incorporated thereafter so they can go in the following month's Nugget.

Membership: not present

Competition:
  • Need to check the surfaces for the portion of Alameda we'll be using for autocrosses this year. It could more grippy and abrasive for tires than where we've been running.
  • There was also discussion of options for new timing equipment for autocross, the purchase of which has already been approved by the board. The hope is to get more reliable equipment which automates part of the timing process.
  • Possible dates for autocross schools were discussed. The issue is getting a suitable site to hold the schools now that Monster Park is no longer suitable.
  • Dan is hoping to put together a 914 autocross shootout with participation from the 914 club.
Webmaster: not present

Social:
  • The banquet room at Harry's Hofbrau has been reserved for the Friday Night Social on the third Friday of the month, 6:00 to 9:00 p.m., for the remainder of 2008.
  • A suggestion was made to schedule some additional social events around the Bay Area to accommodate members in various areas. Mark will come up with some ideas.
  • A budget for the year-end banquet at Blackhawk was distributed. Prizes and door prizes are ready. Mark went over the agenda.
Topics for discussion

1. Setting aside funds to participate in SCCA's autocross site.

The board confirmed a motion from the December, 2007 meeting to set aside funds to participate with SCCA in gaining long-term access to an autocross site.

2. New Seat and Harness Rules for Drivers' Education and Time Trial

There was discussion of allowing newer cars with airbags, stock seats, and 3-point belts to participate in the time trial portion of Drivers' Ed. Larry Sharp is putting together a proposal to PCA National on time trial standards to deal with this issue. The consensus was to table this issue until Larry Sharp prepares his recommendation, and then evaluate possible actions at that point.

Adjournment

The meeting was adjourned at 8:45 p.m. The next Board of Directors meeting is set for Wednesday, February 13, at the residence of the President, Bill Dally. Please email  Bill Dally to add items to the agenda.
GGR Award Winners & Banquet
--by the Editor

Congratulations to this year's GGR award winners. All these folks made tremendous contributions to the club over the past year. Their work (and the many others who help out) not only makes the events happen, it also makes GGR the kind of club it is. Here's a recap.

Johnson
Ross & Paulette Johnson (pictured) and their daughter Kole won Family of the Year for their many efforts for Drivers' Ed and Time Trial Series, including managing registration.

Larry Adams
Larry Adams (on the left in photo) won Competitive Event of the Year for the Carlsen Concours, GGR's annual event which raises thousands of dollars for charity.

Andrew B
Andrew Blyholder (on the right in photo) won Enthusiast of the Year for his and his crew's tireless efforts for the autocross series. Andrew shared the award with his entire crew of drivers, mechanics, and miscellaneous ruffians.

Mark P.
Mark Powell (on the left in photo) won Social Event of the Year for setting up and organizing the behind-the-scenes tours of race teams at Infineon and Laguna Seca. (No, there is nothing suspicious about the payment Mark is about to make to GGR treasurer and past president Bill Benz.)

Carl and Matt Switzer won the Don Matthews Award, which is presented annually to the new member(s) who most represent the enthusiasm and spirit of Don Matthews, in whose memory it is presented. Mike Cullinan won the Don Lang Memorial Award, which is presented annually to the GGR member who most exhibits the spirit of good sportsmanship and service to the Club as shown by Don Lang, in whose memory the award is presented.

Andrew F
Lastly, time trial chair Andrew Forrest won the Perc Bliss Award for his efforts in running and revamping the time trial series, including reversing a years-long decline in attendance. This award honors Perc Bliss, the first President of Golden Gate Region. Each year, the President selects the member who has made the greatest contribution to the club during the year.

Many thanks to those folks who turned out to the Blackhawk Musuem to celebrate and enjoy a sumptuous brunch. More photos are available by David Leong.
The Power Chef
NE Bike
Ham & Egg Fried Rice

--by John Celona, The Power Chef

I realize that Rachel Ray has made a career out of putting entire dinners together, start to finish, in only 30 minutes. For me, about that amount of time is consumed by heating up something I've already made whilst opening the mail, wondering what I forgot to do today, and engaging in our regular debate with Ms. Kitty about what exactly she will be satisfied with this evening.

So, realistically, about an hour start to finish seems more reasonable to me. After all, most of us don't stage our ingredients in advance the way Ms. Ray does. Even then, call me a skeptic but I do suspect there are a few practice runs before she actually films.

This recipe seriously does make a satisfying, healthy, all-in-one dinner in under an hour. Your children will probably even like it. And it's great reheated the next day, so I tend to make it in large quantities and pass a container along to my mother-in-law (who, invariably, calls to thank me and tell me how delicious it is. And doesn't that make it all worthwhile?)

The keys to making this dish healthy and delicious are brown rice, lots of vegetables, and breaking a few rules of chinese cooking to drastically reduce the amount of oil required for stir frying. Normally, fried rice is made with cooled rice that is stir fried in oil to heat it up. That requires a fair amount of oil to keep it from sticking. I've found that, by stir frying everything else first, then adding hot rice at the end, you get a hot dish without all that oil. Also, chinese cooks will typically add salt to their fried rice while cooking it. I've found that adding it to the rice cooking water instead gives you a nice balance of salty ham and rice with non-salty eggs and vegetables. (Hint: it doesn't need soy sauce, either!)

Enjoy.

Ham & Egg Fried Rice

fried rice

The Gist

Cook some scrambled eggs separately. The stir fry together ham chunks with your choice of stir fry vegetables. Add hot cooked rice and the scrambled eggs at the end.

Ingredients

2 cups brown rice
4 cups water
2 tsp. salt
4 eggs
1 Tb. butter
2 Tb. oil or bacon fat
2 cups ham, cut in chunks
4 cups of your choice of one or more stir frying vegetables, such as: bean sprouts, chopped cabbage, bok choy, spinach, or collard greens (which were used in the photo)
1 can sliced water chestnuts, drained
1 can sliced bamboo shoots, drained
2 cups frozen peas
1 bunch green onions, chopped

Method

Combine the brown rice, water, and salt in a sauce pan. Bring to a boil, then turn down to a simmer. Cook until all the water is absorned, then shut the heat off and leave the rice in the pan. This will take about 20 minutes.

While the rice is cooking, take the peas out of the freezer to thaw. Chop the vegatables. Scramble the eggs together, then fry them in a large saute pan with the butter until just barely set. Remove the eggs to a bowl (the saute pan will also work for the rice).

Heat the oil or bacon fat in the skillet over high heat. Add the stir fry vegetables, water chesnuts, and bamboo shoots and toss briefly. Add the ham chunks and toss together until hot. Turn off the heat, then add the rice and toss together. Add the peas and green onions, give it a final toss, and you're ready to go.

Notes

Why cooking rice has a reputation for being difficult remains a mystery to me, much less why one would need a separate appliance like a rice cooker. One part rice to two parts water, simmer until the water is absorbed does it for me every time. Of course, the last time I cooked any type of rice other than whole-grain brown rice was some time in the 70's, so on the matter of whether this method works for white rice I will have to plead ignorance.

When I cook bacon, I drain the fat and save it in a jar in the fridge. It's perfect for recipes like this one, and is also great for just frying eggs. One tablespoon of bacon fat has the same number of calories as one tablespoon of canola oil, with vast flavor differences. As for the cholesterol, well, that's why there's all the vegetables and brown rice.

Bon appetit,
The Power Chef
40 Years Ago in The Nugget: February 1968
--by Jim Bauman, Notorious ex-editor of The Nugget (presently at large)


Feb 40

This month's cover features a snowbound 356 Cabriolet in the snow at Yosemite, near Mirror Lake. I wonder how long the driver kept the top down!

In his monthly column, GGR President Dwight Mitchell commented about the 911 continuing as the Porsche "sedan."  The activites calendar for 1968 was alos published, with some noteworthy events as the Bumper Car Autocross in Santa Cruz, several "ladies" events, a ski weekend in Reno/Tahoe, and the infamous Yosemite Tour in April.

The "San Francisco Racing Drivers Club" honored two GGR members. Peter Buschbaum received the "most improved driver" award, and John Grove received the "Steve Temby" award for being one of racing's "good guys." Alrighty then!

In the classifieds, Brian Carleton advertised a Pebble Beach Concours winning 1964 356C coupe for $4000.

Incidently, it cost 6 cents to mail the Nugget!
Meet the New Webmaster
All of us at GGR are extremely grateful to Paul Larson for stepping forward to pick up the reins of webmaster, especially since that required building an all-new web site! I asked Paul to introduce himself to the club and say a few words. Do check out the new GGR web site if you haven't already done so. It's great!  --Ed.

larsen--by Paul Larson, GGR webmaster

I volunteered to be the webmaster because I like looking at things on the Internet and I figured it would not be to hard to add some content and keep the website working.  After I volunteered, the reality set in and I found out that I would need to design a new website.  Susan [Angebranndt, GGR's longtime webmistress] who has been a big help, wrote me that the code she used was very old and was mixed up with her other websites.  She contacted Richard Chew with the Sierra Nevada Region, who volunteered to install an initial setup on the server.  He was developing a site using an open source program call "Drupal" and was going to help start the site.  I opened an account at www.drupal.org and started learning about the program.  I then met Claude Leglise (the outgoing GGR president) up at Alice's Restaurant for a Boxster brunch.  He recommended I send him an e-mail requesting funds for a website.  The board passed this request and I received a check about a week later.  I purchased a business service with a server on December 19. 2007.  Richard installed a very slim site on December 21,2007 and I was in full gear in adding content.

I looked at a few local websites and I decided to model ours after the San Diego region's website.  I sent an e-mail to the San Diego Webmaster a few weeks before and he informed me that a professional company designed it.  The president of the company was a San Diego member.  I then started building things and would ask Rich questions on Fridays to steer me in the right direction.  I was now full steam ahead and on January 7, 2008, William Dally sent an e-mail out to the board asking for comments on the future website.  I then received a few e-mails with comments and I worked at learning the program and incorporating the items the board wished to see on the website.  Susan mailed me a CD with a lot of content, which made it a lot easier and faster to add content.  Everyone was very happy and gave me great complements on the design of the website. 

car plane
Paul's two flat-sixes. One has a huge advantage in vertical acceleration.


On January 11, 2008 I started the transfer and they said it would take seven to ten days.  Well it did take some time.  I kept putting in the wrong codes, which would stop the transfer.  The transfer finally happened on January 16, 2008.  The site was up, but the bulletin board and the points classification systems were not working.  These sites are on another server and I was stumbling trying to get the codes for them to work.  I cracked the code on January 20, 2008, and everything was finally working.  The site is now in "tweaking mode" and I have some ideas on making things easier for the user.  In the future, I want to add some real videos of what it looks like to drive on the local tracks.  I would like to add some autocross videos.  I would like to add the Golden Gate Bridge as the background in the header.  I would like to add some fade-in and out pictures, among other things.

I would like to thank Rich, Susan, Claude, and the board for all the recommendations.  Their desires kept me pushing for a wonderful website.

As far as a computer background, I do not have a lot of computer training.  I learned Basic and Fortran back in my college days.  I never designed a website and I still do not know HTML code.  What I am good at is learning things fast.  I taught myself how to use Auto-Cad by a one-hour walk thru and reading a lot of books.  I then built some Auto-cad programs.  I used "lisp", an Auto-cad language for the new programs.  The website code is not that hard to learn but you must be careful.  One day I typed in the wrong code and the whole site went down.  I was able to backtrack and corrected the problem.  You can mess up everything just by deleting one word.  Still, this is fun and a good challenge.

My hobbies include family activities.  I try to fly as least once every week.  I own a Cessna Skylane and it happens to have a flat six motor.  I own a 2006 997S and I love driving this car.  I already have over 40,000 miles on this car.  I drive it to the time trial events, drive it all day at the events, and then drive it home.  Nothing is better then a Porsche.  This is the best car I have ever owned.

Hope you enjoy the website.  Check out the Links section (bottom left of the site).  There are sites there that I never knew existed.  Please send your comments.  I still want to add a lot of the existing content but this will take some time.

Paul
Porsche Roads

Leglise2
--by Claude Leglise, Past President

La Honda-Pescadero Loop


Porsche cars are not meant to be driven in bumper-to-bumper traffic on 101, or to follow 18-wheelers on Interstate 5. Sure they can do it, but what is the point? There are better stretches of highway that can best be described as "Porsche roads". They have the right combination of good pavement, scenery and curves that make the drive enjoyable, especially in a car that handles well, accelerates well, and brakes well. The La Honda-Pescadero loop is one such road, right in the GGR neighborhood, that provides fun and relaxation for any Porsche owner.

Start at Alice's Restaurant at the intersection of Skyline (Highway 35) and La Honda Road (Highway 84) in Woodside. While this Alice's Restaurant is not the original Arlo Guthrie sang about, it features a full-fledged Group W Bench under the redwood trees. Check it out.  Alice also has breakfast and lunch for the hungry ones. Don't forget to fill up your tank. 

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From Alice's turn west on La Honda Road towards Pescadero. The fun begins right away with long esses in the redwood forest, followed by a series of turns with the proper camber, all the way to La Honda, 6 miles down the road. On the way you may want to stop near the Red Barn for a photo opportunity and, weather permitting, a view of the Pacific Ocean.

A few miles past La Honda, the redwoods disappear as the valley opens up. The curves increase radius and spacing, and some dotted yellow lines appear. A welcome relief if you have been following a slow poke all this time. In San Gregorio, the General Store at the intersection of La Honda Road and Stage Road is a fun stop. On a cold day, the hot buttered rum is perfect for all but the designated driver. On weekends, there is a live band. You can also stock up on western gear and politically engaged T-shirts.

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Whether you stop at the General Store or not, when you get to San Gregorio, turn left on Stage Road. This 1 1/2 lane road dates back to the Spanish era of California's history and parallels Highway 1. No high speeds here as the pavement is not in the best of shapes, but the unfamiliar scenery is worth the detour. There is room for a 911 and a Hummer to cross paths (I tested that), but be careful. 

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Near Jacobs Farm, at mile 20, you are likely to run into a large number of beautiful peacocks, who cross the road for no apparent reason. Then at mile 22, you arrive in Pescadero. Duarte's Tavern offers both history and good food, while next door, Made in Pescadero features art and furniture created by local artists.

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At the stop sign, turn left on Pescadero Creek Road. As the name implies, you are now following the valley of Pescadero Creek back up the mountain. Soon after the road leaves town, it goes back into the redwood forest. It gets dark in there even during sunny days. Memorial Park, at mile 30, and Sam McDonald Park, at mile 33, are both full of interesting walking trails through the forest. At mile 35 you are back to Highway 84, a mile or so south of La Honda.

Going up the hill, the road would be suitable for a European-style course de côte, were it closed to traffic. The constabulary is generally out in force on week-ends trying to keep the squids (irresponsible members of the motorcycle community) from hitting the pavement skin first. At mile 43, you are back at Alice's. The complete loop will take a little over an hour if all you want to do is drive. You can also make a day outing out of it and enjoy the sights and smells at a leisurely pace.

Scale: 1∂ to 5∂

Twistiness

Pavement quality

Scenery

La Honda Rd

∂∂∂∂∂

∂∂∂∂

∂∂∂

Stage Rd

∂∂∂∂∂

∂∂

∂∂∂

Pescadero Creek Rd

∂∂∂∂∂

∂∂∂∂

∂∂∂∂

 

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Claude
Vintage Racing Stories
--by Michael Steinberg, GGR member

"I can't wait for this race to be over ", I said after the sun blinded me in turn 9 and once again in turn 1. Willow Springs can eat you up if your try to push to hard.

vara1
 Subaru WRX flat towing Herbie the 912

This is the last race of the year with VARA ( Vintage Automobile Racing Association ). A few more laps and it will be o.k. Why is this Alfa Romeo following so closely into turn 9? If he is trusting my lead, good luck to both of us. I better watch that slippery Lotus turn ahead of me, ooh great, where did he go?

As I pass through a dust cloud it reminded me of our first race of the season here at Willow Springs. Most everybody seems to be rusty and dusting off their talent from a winter's rest.
The green flag is thrown and forty maniacs rush bumper to bumper 3 to 4 cars wide into turn 1. I definitely want to be inside on this turn. It seems somebody else needed my space.

Darting below me into the dirt, four wheels more off than on, a shower of machine gun rocks, pepper the car. Somehow everybody seems now be racing into the Turn 2 uphill sweeper
except me. My whole windshield is shattered and I can't see in front of me.

vara2
On the grid at Willow Springs

"Dang, I could have been a contender, " I thought as I slowly drove around the track. It was the only time I was able to take Turn 9 with confidence.

Our next race was at California Speedway and I was ready. My friend who owns a Cup car advised to take along a sandwich during the race. Knowing my 912 is not the fastest thing on wheels, (though it does like to corner), he said as I enter back on to the oval, from the inside road course, I will have ample time to eat or read before the next corner.

Time can pass pretty slowly once you're on the banked Nascar oval. I think my friend exaggerated slightly because I think with smaller hors d'oeuvres it would have been possible.

I did manage to push the 912 to 130 mph at 7400 rpm. A little squirrely with the short wheel base, but manageable. The only real excitement came during the high speed banked sweeper turn as a plastic grocery bag decided to play chicken with me. At this moment I am the only car around. I drop down by about six inches, the bag mimics my move.

One bag on the whole track and I am going to run over it at full speed. I never saw it my rear view mirror. After the race I found it very tightly wrapped around my axle like strings of pulled taffy. No damage but an interesting moment.

vara3
Taking home the checkered flag at Willow Springs

The VARA group is based in Southern California. Each race weekend their are wonderful and outstanding race cars to watch. Yes, a large group of Porsche racers with their 2.0 and 2.5's and 914-6's always ready to push hard. Alfa Romeo's, Lotus Elan's, Ford Cortina's, Club Ford's, Lola's, Formula Mazda's, Ralt's, Van Diemen's, Datsun's, BMW's, Triumph's,
Mustang's, Covette's, Camero's, and Shelby's.

We are able to run some incredible tracks, like, Phoenix Int'l Speedway, Las Vegas Int'l Speedway, California Speedway, Buttonwillow and Willow Springs. Not too shabby for a racing season. Of course my first favorite adopted family is GGR. I wanted to be sure you knew.

I have learned a lot about racing this year and I know it will also make me a better GGR Instructor.

Looking forward to the GGR 2008 season!

Best,
Michael Steinberg
GGR Instructor TT
2007 First Place Winner EP, VARA
Porsches Stars at Daytona
TRG PORSCHES FINISH SECOND, THIRD AND FOURTH IN GT CLASS AT
ROLEX 24; BRUMOS, ALEX JOB DP PORSCHES LEAD INTO LAST HOURS

DAYTONA BEACH, Fla. - January 27 - Both the Porsche 911 GT3 Cup cars and the various Porsche-powered Daytona Prototype racers led their class during long periods of of time at the 2008 Rolex 24 Hours at Daytona, giving the teams encouragement for the upcoming Rolex Grand-Am Sports Car points chase.

group Porsches
Starting Porsches at Daytona

In the Daytona Prototype class, both the #58 Brumos Porsche - Darren Law, David Donohue, and Buddy Rice - and the #59 team car - Hurley Haywood, J.C. France, Terry Borcheller and Joao Barbosa - lead the race overall during the first three-quarters of the race, with the #58 car rupturing a fuel cell and the #59 car - while leading the race in the 19th hour - broke a tie rod and crashed.  Both cars finished the race, but well down in the standings.

Brumos Porsche
The Brumos Racing Porsche Riley

The Ruby Tuesday DP Porsche-powered Crawford of Alex Job Racing held a lead at the six-hour and the 18-hour marks, but the car, driven by the team of Patrick Long, Joey Hand, Andy Wallace and Bill Auberlin, suffered terminal mechanical failure in hour 20.

Alex porsche
The Alex Job Racing Porsche Crawford

In the GT class, Porsche, Pontiac, Mazda waged a fierce battle for the entire race, with Porsche 911 GT3 Cup cars from both TRG and Farnbacher Loles both swapping the lead with the Mazdas and Pontiacs throughout the event.  Near the end, however, the Pontiacs had problems, and the #70 SpeedSource Mazda gained an advantage over three of the TRG Porsches.

"Finishing second, third and fourth is huge for our team and drivers who are competing for the championship in the 2008 Rolex Grand-Am series.  Naturally, we would have like to win the top spot on the podium, but some mechanical problems and some bad luck prevented that from happening," said TRG team owner Kevin Buckler.

The #66 TRG Porsche of Bryce Miller/Ted Ballou/Andy Lally/Richard Westbrook finished second in GT, with the #67 team Porsche of Tim George, Jr./Spencer Pumpelly/Bryan Sellers/Romain Dumas/Emmanuel Collard third and the #64 team car of Jim Lowe/Jim Pace/Johannes van Overbeek/Tim Sugden/RJ Valentine fourth.

TRG porsche
One of the TRG 911 GT3 Cup cars

For Farnbacher Loles, the #87 Porsche 911 GT3 Cup driven by Dominik Farnbacher/Pierre Ehret/Timo Bernhard/Dirk Werner was the highest finishing car for the Connecticut-based team (eighth in GT), and the #86 team car of Sascha Maassen/Joerg Bergmeister/Wolf Henzler/Eric Lux/Leh Keen led the class several times before control arm and brake issues sidelined their first-place chase.

The other Porsche top-ten GT finisher was the #80 Synergy Racing Porsche 911 GT3 Cup of Mark Greenberg/Daimien Faulkner/Jan Heylin/Lance Arnold (sixth).

Complete results as well as pit notes are available at www.grand-am.com.    

More photos from the night racing at the Rolex 24 are here.

2008 Drivers' Ed & Time Trial Schedule
Following a very quiet and successful foray into the headquarters of the Drivers' Ed National Committee at the Watering Hole Taco Bar, we are very pleased to be able to bring you the ground school and Drivers' Ed schedule for 2008. Time to start marking your calendar, checking over your chariot, and shopping for sticky tires.

  Sat Jan 26, '08   Ground School Round Table Pizza, Concord

  Feb 16-17, '08   Driver's Ed & Time Trial #1 Infineon Raceway

  Sat Mar 29, '08   Ground School Round Table Pizza, Concord

  Apr 18-20, '08   Driver's Ed & Time Trial #2 Thunderhill

  Sat May 3, '08   Ground School Round Table Pizza, Concord

  May 24-25, '08   Driver's Ed & Time Trial #3 Buttonwillow

  Sat Jul 26, '08   Ground School Round Table Pizza, Concord

  Aug 16-17, '08   Driver's Ed & Time Trial #4 Thunderhill

  Sat Aug 30, '08   Ground School Round Table Pizza, Concord

  Sep 20-21, '08   Driver's Ed & Time Trial #5 Thunderhill

More on the Panamerica
Porsche Releases More Details On Panamera

Ground Breaking Four-Door GT to be Offered with Porsche Hybrid System

ATLANTA--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Jan. 7, 2008--Dr. Ing. h. c. F. Porsche AG, Stuttgart, announced today that it is developing a hybrid drive version of its highly anticipated four-door Gran Turismo. The Panamera Hybrid will utilize the same gas-electric drive concept as the Cayenne Hybrid that comes to market at the end of the decade and will claim a remarkable 30% reduction of fuel consumption.

The full parallel hybrid system of the Panamera will be configured with the battery unit positioned below the luggage compartment, and hybrid module, comprising of an additional clutch and electric motor, will be between the engine and transmission. Depending on driving conditions, the hybrid module has the ability to disengage either the combustion engine or the electric motor, or to combine both drive systems as one joint power unit. This flexibility results in benefits such as a zero emissions driving mode, fuel savings in both city and highway driving and maximum performance when desired.

Panamerica hybrid

The Panamera, which represents Porsche's fourth model line, will make its world debut in 2009 and promises to redefine the Gran Turismo category by featuring a unique design package that will afford equally generous front and rear space and seating comfort for four while retaining the sporting and unmistakable driving dynamics of every Porsche. Introduced initially with traditional drivetrains, the hybrid version of the Panamera will be offered at a later date.

Porsche Cars North America, Inc. (PCNA), based in Atlanta, GA, and its subsidiary, Porsche Cars Canada, Ltd., are the exclusive importers of Porsche sports cars and Cayenne sport utility vehicles for the United States and Canada. A wholly owned, indirect subsidiary of Dr. Ing. h. c. F. Porsche AG, PCNA employs approximately 250 people who provide Porsche vehicles, parts, service, marketing and training for its 212 U.S. and Canadian dealers. They, in turn, provide Porsche owners with best-in-class service.
911 GT3 Named "Most Wanted"
--press release from PCNA

PORSCHE® 911® GT3 WINS EDMUNDS.COM 'MOST-WANTED' AWARD

Edmunds' Inside Line editors call Porsche's race-bred 911 'an unforgettable thrill'

ATLANTA, January 10, 2008 - The auto editors at Edmunds' Inside Line, Edmunds.com's online automotive magazine, had a tough job in 2007 as they tested and reviewed 268 new cars and trucks and were then asked to select only the best for their 2008 Editors' Most Wanted Awards.  In the end the Porsche 911 GT3 endured their expert scrutiny, scoring a victory and driving off with this very prestigious and important award.

This year Scott Oldham, Inside Line editor-in-chief, had only one rule: the editors must have tested the car or truck by Dec. 1, 2007.  All vehicles were eligible for all six slots -- speed, luxury, hauling, commuting, family and instant classic.  With no price cap or restrictive 'new models only' or similar requirements, the editors were allowed to simply pick their personal favorites.

GT3
Performance 415 hp @ 7,600 rpm
0-60 mph: 4.1 sec.
Top Track Speed: 193 mph
MSRP $ 107,500.00

"The GT3 provides world-class performance just a couple of short steps removed from that
legendary racing iron, and it does so in a package accessible to mere mortals.  This is the essence of the Porsche story, and it makes this car an unforgettable thrill," said Dan Edmunds, Edmunds' Director of Vehicle Testing.  Oldham added, "The Porsche 911 GT3 is our favorite Porsche.  It's as if everything that Porsche has ever known about fast cars has been stuffed into this 911."

The Porsche 911 GT3 is also the base model for the world's most-produced race car, the Porsche 911 GT3 Cup.  Produced on the same assembly line as the street cars in Stuttgart, the Cup car is the racer of choice in the SCCA SPEED World Challenge GT, the IMSA GT3 Cup Challenge, and the Rolex Grand-Am GT Sports Car championship, including this month's Rolex 24 at Daytona.  The GT3 RS, the model with improved aerodynamics and a stiffer suspension, is the basis for the Porsche 911 GT3 R/RS/RSR, the most successful racer in the ten years of the American Le Mans Series.

At 415 horsepower, the 911 GT3 is Porsche's most powerful non-turbocharged sports car and is based on the current 911 platform that debuted in 2005.  With more than 40 years of road- and race-proven success, the 911 model line now features 15 variants to fulfill all sports car enthusiast whims, and as evidenced by a new 911 sales record in 2007, the iconic rear-engine sports car continues to thrill Porsche loyalists and dreamers.  Porsche sold 12,493 911s in 2007, vs. 12,045 units sold in 2006.

Crab 34
Crab34
European Porsche Parade 2008
--by Kathrin Brandstaetter, Porsche club coordinator

The European Parade of 2008 will take place in Sardinia from the 8th to 11th of May. This meeting for all Porsche Clubs worldwide, will take you to the extraordinarily beautiful Costa Smeralda. Highlights of the Porsche Parade 2008 include the Photo Rally "Mare e Terra" and the Concours d'Elégance in the "Marina Vecchia" at Porta Cervo. On the final evening there will be a farewell gala dinner in a magical environment along with the presentation of prizes.

Parade2
Real cobblestones. Not pavers from Home Depot.

More information about the Porsche Parade 2008 can be found in German, English and Italian under the following link.

We would like to announce that from today until the 31st of December 2008 you can register yourself for the European Porsche Parade 2008 online or via fax. Please be aware that there is a limitation of 250 cars.

Parade1
There are plenty of places to park your tush, too.

If you have further questions please contact the Federation of Italian Porsche Clubs. A special hotline has been prepared, which is accessible from Monday till Friday 4 p.m. till 8 p.m.

Tel. +39 040 7469500

We are looking forward to seeing you next year in Sardinia.

Best regards,
Your Team of worldwide Porsche Club Coordination

Dr. Ing. h.c. F.  Porsche Aktiengesellschaft
Sitz der Gesellschaft: Stuttgart
Registergericht: Amtsgericht Stuttgart HRB-Nr. 5211
Vorsitzender des Aufsichtsrats: Dr. Wolfgang Porsche
Vorstand: Dr.-Ing. Wendelin Wiedeking, Vorsitzender
Klaus Berning, Wolfgang Dürheimer, Thomas Edig, Holger P. Härter, Michael Macht

Die vorgenannten Angaben werden jeder E-Mail automatisch hinzugefügt. Dies ist kein Anerkenntnis,dass es sich beim Inhalt dieser E-Mail um eine rechtsverbindliche Erklärung der Porsche AG handelt.Erklärungen, die die Porsche AG verpflichten, bedürfen jeweils der Unterschrift durch zwei zeichnungs-berechtigte Personen der AG.
LA Lit & Toy Show
LA Lit and Toy Show
Toy Show

Now in its 25th year, over 1,200 people attend the annual Porsche and Vintage V-W Literature, Toy/Model, & Memorabilia Swap Meet at the Los Angeles Airport Hilton Hotel.  The meet has over 225 tables with tens of thousands of collectibles - posters, sales literature, toys, models, factory gift items, press kits,  technical literature, small trim items, and accessories for Porsches and vintage VW's.  The meet is held in two huge ballrooms on the main floor of the Airport Hilton, 5711 W. Century Blvd., Los Angeles - very close by Los Angeles International Airport.  The public is admitted at 9:00 a.m. for $5 each at the door.  "Earlybird" shoppers are admitted with the vendors at 7:30 a.m. for $25 at the door.  Special discounted room rates are available from the LA Airport Hilton directly at 310-410-4000.  Please ask for the special room rates under the promotional code "PCH."

For more information, go to the web site.

Contact by email: (Prescott Kelly, Jim Perrin or Wayne Callaway)
Contact by Phone: Wayne Callaway at 909-930-1999 (Work - weekdays 9am to 5pm Pacific time)
Thanks very much to Michael Steinberg, Claude Leglise, Paul Larson, and Jim Bauman for putting articles (with photos!) together for this month's Nugget. Much appreciated. Do keep them coming. We'll print anything that won't run us afoul of the FCC.

As always, thanks for reading.
John Celona
Porsche Club of America-Golden Gate Region
Porsche Club of America--Golden Gate Region | Nugget Headquarters | 505 Vista Ave | San Carlos | CA | 94070
Begin forwarded message:

From: John Celona <nugget-ed@sbcglobal.net>
Subject: From Porsche Club of America--Golden Gate Region
Date: February 29, 2008 6:55:52 PM PST

St PatrickGGR Logo
Porsche Club of America
Golden Gate Region




March, 2008 - Vol 48, Number 3
In This Issue
President's Message
Letter from the Editor
Competition Corner
Jan. Membership
Board of Directors
DE & TT #1
2008 DE Schedule
The Power Chef
40 Years Ago in the Nugget
GGR Tech Bulletin
Showroom Stock Classes
2008 Parade Registration
New PCNA President
New 911 GT3 RSR
Porsche Boot Camp
New Cayenne GTS
Crab 34
Zone 7 Autocrosses
Topless Concours
Yosemite Region Concours
Quick Links
Dear Porsche Enthusiast,

Welcome to The Nugget, the email newsletter of the Golden Gate Region, Porsche Club of America.
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If you have any trouble viewing this email, you can click here to go to the archive of PDF versions of this newsletter. For comments or feedback, click here to email the editor.

Thanks for reading.
Join Our Mailing List!
Zone 7 logoPCA logo

Pawlina









Pawlina Paraskova CG
Executive Editor of The Nugget
Carlsen ad
President's Message
Bill Dally--by Bill Dally, GGR President




Bill has been buried at work this month. He'll be back next month. --Ed.
Jerry WoodsSmart Racing
Letter from the Editor
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--by John Celona, Nugget Editor

Calling for a GGR Historian!

Yes, that's right, we're looking for a GGR Historian. Believe it or not, I'm not making this position up. It's actually defined in GGR's so-called "Red Book," which is the repository of all sorts of procedures, definitions, and records for the club. The name must go back to some obscure connection with Chairman Mao's enthusiasm for Porsches, but that's another matter.

Anyway, the historian would be taking on just one task: creating an electronic archive of back issues of The Nugget. Much of that would be just assembling existing PDF versions of The Nugget, but it would involve some scanning when only paper versions are available. Probably, amongst all the club members and what's in the GGR storage area, a complete collection is available. And the webmaster opines that, depending on how large the archive is, some significant portion of it could be made available to all members on the web site.

If you're interested in taking this on, please click on my photo to send me an email. It would be a lot of fun, and financial support from the club is available (for scanning costs, for example).

As always, thanks for reading.

John
CommCovRennwerks
Competition Corner
Thompson--by Dan Thompson, Competition Director

Now we are into the competitive season in Time Trial, with a wonderful two days of lite fog in the mornings and warm sun in the afternoons at Infineon Raceway. And yes, we actually got timed runs in. We now have track records for Infineon, after 4 tries. Unfortunately this may be our last trip back to Infineon for awhile. We had a less than stellar turn out, and without enough folks to run the track, the fees may become prohibitive for future forays there. If you didn't run Infineon, you missed a great weekend of weather and track time.

For our remaining DE/TT events for 2008, any Porsche may attend the DE portion of the weekend using stock 3 point belts with stock seats. If you plan on attending one of our events you need to make sure your stock belts and seats are in good working order. If you have an older car we strongly suggest you replace your belts with new ones. UV degradation happens in a very short time, and your belts are your first line of safety on the track. Instructors have the last say as to whether they will instruct in your car if your seats or belts are suspect, so err on the side of safety.

On to the Autocross series. Our first event will be March 15 at Alameda Point. We will now be using one of the actual Navy base runways. #725 if you want to do a search on Google Earth. We have about 3,000 feet of length but only about 200 feet of width. This will lead to some interesting course designs. But I am sure with the talented course designers we have in GGR, we will be able to utilize the new venue to it's fullest after our first visit.

And later this year we will be having a 914 Shoot Out, it will be a two-day event run in conjunction with the Zone7 AXs scheduled for Marina Airport on August 2 and 3. We are planning on some special things for the 914s that come and run either one or both days. Plan on being there. More information on that event to come as our plans come together. You can preregister for the 914 Shoot Out on www.motorsportreg.com

OK, the weather is improving so you have no more excuses. Get the Porsche out of the garage and join us at one of our many driving events this season. Hope to see you out there.

Dan
January Membership Report
-by Jeff Kost, Membership Director
Jeff Kost
Total Members:     2531
Primary:               1480
Affiliate:               1050
Life:                          1

New Members:     25
Transfers In:        13
Transfers Out:       7



New Members

Maribel Amodo-Chiu

Daly City

 

Craig Backer

San Francisco

1982 911

Tammy Bailey

Campbell

 

Jerry Buysse

Los Altos

2008 911 S

Rob Chiang

Santa Clara

2008 Cayenne

Michael Chiu

Daly City

2007 Cayman S

Jim Cismowski

Pleasant Hill

 

Robert Deforest

Fremont

1985 911

Bill & David Ellsworth

Oxnard

2000 Boxster S

Michael Fox

Los Altos

2008 Cayenne

Sonia Gomez-Rexelius

San Francisco

 

David & Sayuri Grieshaber

South San Francisco

2007 Cayman S

Dereck Horn

Palo Alto

1973 914

Sidney Huey

Fremont

2002 996

Kai Klassen

San Francisco

 

Joe Lee

Castro Valley

1968 912

Ron Lewis

Hayward

2003 911-966

George Liu

Hillsborough

 

Jeff Long

Fremont

 

Robert Maranda

Palo Alto

1996 911C2

Stephanie Minorgan

Palo Alto

 

Pere & Juan Obrador

Mountain View

2008 Carrera

Wayne Okubo

Cupertino

1996 993

Timothy Place

Brisbane 4066

1990 928 S4

Kevin Platshon

Menlo Park

1985 911

Linda Preston

San Carlos

1996 911

Peter Rexelius

San Francisco

2003 996 C2

Tracy Seigart

San Jose

 

Evan Shahin

San Jose

2006 Cayman S

Douglas Sharpe

San Jose

2007 911 Turbo

Philip Slattery

Palo Alto

 

Laura Swan

Hayward

 

James Syar

San Francisco

1975 911 S

Clifford Veltenaar

San Jose

1972 911E

Stephen Wolking

Concord

1979 930

Jeanne Wu

Hillsborough

2005 Cayenne


Anniversaries


25 Years

Snookie Arolla

Santa Clara


20 Years

Jeanette Ramies

Portola Valley

 

Hp Wilms

Mill Valley

1990 964

 
15 Years

Michael Cullinan

Hollister

1980 911

Patricia Kindred

Morgan Hill

 

Kevin Morrissey

San Francisco

1996 993

John Sherck

Los Gatos

1969 911


10 Years

Jesse Avilla

Union City

1996 993 C4S

Eelco & Carol Bergman

Sunnyvale

1970 911s

James Paugh

Belmont

1974 911

Moe Reitman

San Francisco

1998 911

Patricia Thompson

Morris Plains

 

Gail Wakeman

Burlingame

 

5 Years

Kevin Clark

San Francisco

 

Sondra Cooper

San Rafael

 

Elizabeth Culp

San Carlos

 

P Fuentebella

South San Francisco

2003 Boxster

Lisa Goodins

Issaquah

 

Kristina Hansen

San Carlos

 

Christi Hilton

Pleasanton

 

John Jefferies

Santa Cruz

1976 911

Larry Kepic

Pacifica

 

Bohumil Kypta

Belmont

1983 911SC

Henry Lee

San Francisco

 

Jennifer Locanthi

Beaverton

 

Susan Madson

San Francisco

 

Robin Minor

Tiburon

 

Selva Naidu

San Jose

2003 Boxster

Leonard Stanton

Alameda

1983 911 SC

Volker Weber

Hamburg

1961 356 BT5

John Yovino

Union City

2002 986 Cabrio


Board of Directors
Celona--by John Celona, GGR Secretary

GGR Board Meeting Minutes
February 13, 2008

Call to Order

The meeting was called to order at 7 p.m. at the house of the president, Bill Dally. Present were Bill Dally, Dan Thompson, Larry Sharp, Matt Switzer, Mark Powell, Paul Larson, Andrew Forrest, John Celona, Bill Benz, Larry Adams, Bob Murillo, and Claude Leglise. Jeff Kost was absent.

Call for agenda changes: none
Call for calendar changes: none

Minutes of the January meeting were approved.

Postmortem of events
  • 1/13/08 Awards Brunch
  • 1/18/08 Harry's Social
  • 1/19 Zone 7 Presidents Meeting and Awards Dinner: National PCA Vice-president was present. His major concern was liability. He emphasized that PCA cannot sponsor a carting event because it's not covered by insurance.
  • 1/26 GGR Ground School
  • 2/2 Boxster Brunch 10am at Alice's Restaurant
  • 2/2 Tech inspection S Car Go
  • 2/2 Tech Inspection David Loop
  • 2/9 Tech Inspection Carlsen

Directors' Reports

President:
nothing to report

Vice-President:

Upcoming event status report:
  • 2/22 Friday Night Social
  • 3/15 Auto X  #1 Alameda
Certificates are ordered for the following events:
  • DE/TT # 1 Infineon
  • 3/15 Auto X  #1 Alameda
Treasurer:  The treasurer presented a report recapping income and expenses for the year to date. Income was from time trial registrations and the end-of-year banquet. Expense items were a donation to Child Advocates Charity, renewal on the GGR storage area, banquet expenses, and books for ground school. The total bank balance is down from $128k to 118k. The bank account will soon be down another $30k due to time trial expenses in advance of the actual events.

Secretary:  visited the GGR storage area. It's costing the club $1300 per year for that, and is filled with a lot of items the club doesn't need to keep (a box of paper bags, an old time trial banner, etc.) After discussion, two action items emerged:
  1. Solicit to fill the position of club historian (presently unfilled) with the goal of creating an electronic archive of back issues of the Nugget to hold onto instead of the paper copies.
  2. Organize a trip down to the storage area to clean it out and sort items into "keep" and "don't keep" piles. Hopefully, the "keep" pile won't require a storage area, or can be stored in a much smaller and less expensive storage area.
Social: a number of suggestions have been made for upcoming events, but nothing has been planned yet.

Membership: not present

Competition:
  • Signups for the first time trial at Infineon are significantly below the budgeted number and it presently looks like the event may lose money.
  • The autocrosses at Marina (GGR and LPR on consecutive days) will include an event-within-an-event: a 914 shootout. The purpose is to get some of the many 914 club people to the events, and maybe even induce them to attend some other autocrosses or time trials.
  • Research on the specifications for a new timing system for autocross is continuing. The system needs to be specified for all components (software, computer, wireless sensors, bar code reader, etc.) and we need to make sure all components are compatible.
  • Alameda will be a challenge to lay out courses because the runway area is 200 feet wide, although 4000 feet long. This doesn't leave a lot of lateral space of laying out a course with cars going down and coming back.
  • An agenda item for the next meeting is to find out the status of SCCA's efforts to obtain long-term access to an autocross venue.
Webmaster: no problema. Everything's fine.

Topics for discussion

Proposal 1.
Run 3 timed laps instead of two.
This is an attempt to increase TT participation. The amount of extra time needed is manageable. Implementing this will be up to the TT chair.
 
Proposal 2. Allow DE cars a "taste of TT" by allowing them to run 2-3 laps in the TT format after all official timing has ceased. Participant self-timing may be allowed.

This is an attempt to increase TT participation. The amount of extra time needed is manageable and participation can be limited. There will be no timing whatsoever so this is essentially a DE run session with the cars spaced out and allowed 2-3 laps.

The grid for this can be managed informally. There may be participant  qualifications, e.g., they must be certificated, not new to track. This would be moot if PCA National updates there TT minimum standards. In the meanwhile, we can try to hook a few more TT participants and not run afoul of the rules.

This proposal will be discussed further.

Proposal 3: the showroom stock classes are being added for autocross. This has already been approved. This will provide separate classes for cars which are as-delivered, starting with 1990 and newer 911's, all Boxsters, all Caymans, and all Cayennes. The points system will be continued for older and for modified Porsches.

4. Sponsorship Status: the banner will be at the first event. T-shirts will be at the second event. Recognition and thanks goes to Mac Cranford, who took on the job of following up with all the prospective sponsors and getting sponsorship commitments.

5. SVR  Hard Copy  Stats. SVR allows members to receive a printed copy of their newsletter for an additional cost of $20 per year. 65 out of about 600 members signed up for this. There was discussion that this doesn't make sense for GGR because of the considerable additional time required to create a printed version, because the club is so much larger, and because the Nugget has been extensively redesigned to take advantage of its electronic format.

6. Board email address and GGR Announce. The former system for sending an email to the GGR board alias and for sending out announcements to a "GGR Announce" list went away with the old web site. We need to figure out a way to recreate this capability. Paul, Andrew, and Claude will work these issues.

7. Discussion of safety rules for DE and TT events.

a. Matching seats. This issue has been sorted out with the help of Larry Sharp.

b. DE belts. The present rules read that only cars with airbags can participate in DE with stock, three-point belts. The proposal is to conform to PCA rules which state any stock car can participate in DE. Under the present rules, all safety equipment is subject to tech inspection upon arrival at the track, and instructors have discretion to refuse to instruct in cars with safety equipment that is not in acceptable condition. The consensus was to ensure that safety equipment is closely examined in tech inspection, and that instructors are reminded of their rights and responsibilities. Motion was made and passed to conform to PCA minimum standards for DE with 6 in favor, 1 opposed.

c. TT belts. Larry Sharp reported that PCA National is adopting the same minimum standards for time trials as for drivers' education. The motion was made to (1) allow cars (a) with front and side air bags and (b) less than 250 modification points to participate with stock seat belts, or (2) to conform to PCA National standards if they are more strict. Past President Claude Leglise asks that the minutes reflect his opposition to the motion. The votes were 3 in favor, 3 against (1 absent), so the motion did not pass.

A motion was made that, upon adoption of PCA National standards (which are expected to be less strict), that the club adopt this proposal (which is more strict than the rules proposed at National). By consensus, this motion was tabled pending the actual adoption by PCA National.

Adjournment

The meeting was adjourned at  9 p.m. The next meeting will be on Wednesday, March 19 at 7 p.m. at the home of the President, Bill Dally. Please contact the President, Bill Dally, at ggrpresident@gmail.com to add items to the agenda.

Drivers' Ed & Time Trial #1 at Infineon Raceway
Forrest --by Andrew Forrest, Drivers' Ed & Time Trial Chair

Infineon DE-TT #1 Review/The 2008 Series Theme/Some Exciting News about TT Eligibility

The 2008 Driver's Education and Time Trial season got off to a great start at Infineon Raceway mid-February with nary a drop of rain and quite a few smiles to go around.  Approximately half the participants elected to participate in the timed runs and some very good results were obtained.  Those competitors who couldn't join us at this past event should be aware -- your nemeses have got a head start on points accumulation in the Time Trial Series!

infin 4
David Loop, our newest GGR Instructor, leads Scott Reynolds in the esses
photo by David Wong, Avatar Numedia


Infin 1
Mike McDonald ceding to Marc Blatt, Glynn Dennis Sr., Tom Thomas, and Antoun Nabhan

This year's series theme is a pun on a popular Sci-Fi Comedy Movie from the 80s: "Track to the Future".  It represents our continued emphasis on growing our series by concentrating on the roots of what has made it great in the past while recognizing the shift in our members' cars towards more modern examples.  Our Driver's Education and Time Trial team has spent several years evolving our program to accommodate the many of you out there with Boxsters, 996s, 997s and now Caymans (not to mention GT-3s) all the while ensuring that core features of our series, such as our talented and experienced instructor corps continue to shine.

Infin 2
Beautiful weather...

Exciting news: is your car not eligible for Time Trial? It may be soon... Many of you are no doubt familiar with the Driver's Education Minimum Standards that our national club has put forth -- they form the basis of every PCA region's DE program.  Some time during this year, it is anticipated that PCA National will be adopting a set of Minimum Standards for Time Trial which will resemble the DE standards closely with respect to car preparation requirements.  The GGR Board of Directors has approved in principle, expanding the eligibility for Time Trial to newer cars (multiple-airbag) that are not overly modified (fewer than 250 modification points) once these national TT standards are officially adopted.  This means owners of largely stock cars such as 1999 (or newer) Boxsters will be eligible to participate in the Time Trial competition without installing multi-point harnesses and the corresponding appropriate seats.  This development could even happen before our next event!

Infin 3
...and plenty of track time!
The lone silver car in the foreground ascending the hill to Turn 2 is Andrew Jones. In the far distance in that same photo, entering Turn 6 are Tom Thomas, Thilo Koslowski, and Jeff Kost.
photo by Claude Leglise

Our next track event is this April 18 - 20 at Thunderhill Park Raceway near Willows, CA.  You may attend Friday, the weekend, or all three days.  Spring is a beautiful time of year to spend at Thunderhill, we hope you'll be able to join us.  Watch the web site for registration information.

Andrew Forrest, GGRTTChair@gmail.com
2008 GGR DE/TT Chair
650 387 4019

 Johnsons3

In the paddock at Infineon Raceway, Proud parents Ross and Paulette Johnson beam over son Kole as he demonstrates his apex-cone-seeking leftward glance, suitable for use at turn two at Thunderhill (CCW).  Note also his adherence to proper GGR procedure as evidenced by the prominently visible annual tech sticker on his vehicle.

photo by 25-year GGR member Sergio Meza
2008 Drivers' Ed & Time Trial Schedule
TT banner
 










  Sat Mar 29, '08   Ground School Round Table Pizza, Concord

  Apr 18-20, '08   Driver's Ed & Time Trial #2 Thunderhill

  Sat May 3, '08   Ground School Round Table Pizza, Concord

  May 24-25, '08   Driver's Ed & Time Trial #3 Buttonwillow

  Sat Jul 26, '08   Ground School Round Table Pizza, Concord

  Aug 16-17, '08   Driver's Ed & Time Trial #4 Thunderhill

  Sat Aug 30, '08   Ground School Round Table Pizza, Concord

  Sep 20-21, '08   Driver's Ed & Time Trial #5 Thunderhill

The Power Chef
NE Bike
Kitty Culinary Tips

--by John Celona, The Power Chef

If you're a cat owner, you know all too well that the legendary finicky-ness of Morris The Cat is not just the creation of deluded copy writers. Unlike dogs, who seem to consume most anything that falls near them, cats indeed can be very picky about what they eat.

The Executive Editor of The Nugget, Ms. Pawlina Paraskova CG (a.k.a. The Intrepid Miss Kitty) is certainly among them. She has sniffed and walked past a wide assortment of items. Most dry cat food is a big no, but she does like Purina salmon flavor with brown rice (not that I can fault her for going for the whole grains!)

Likewise with wet cat food. Friskies Salmon Dinner is a big winner and she'll tolerate some of the other fish flavors, but Mixed Grill is a big loser. Chunk light tuna (the human variety) is also a favorite, but not the solid white (I guess it's not fishy enough!). And, suprisingly enough, Tiki Cat is a real hit-or-miss--despite costing twice what a can of tuna costs!

Then there's Miss Kitty's all-time favorite: raw chicken liver. She goes crazy just at the smell of it. I suppose it must remind her of some of the better birds she's eaten in our yard. I have to make sure she's not around when I'm washing fresh chickens or she'll be yowling at my feet until she's gotten some. (Yes, she would also be quite happy to down any of the other parts of the chicken, too!).

Of course, we could simply throw in the towel and feed her just tuna and raw chicken parts, but--her sterling carnivore credentials notwithstanding--I worry that the hundreds of people who've devoted their lives to developing cat foods may have actually put some other things in there that are good for her.

Accordingly, in the interests of domestic tranquility, I've developed a recipe for Kitty Kasserole which seems a reasonable compromise between nutrition and utter indulgence. See if your cat agrees! (Note: dogs will likely inhale it also.)

Following the recipe is another tip for easily administering pills when your cat needs them.

Kitty Kasserole

KittyKass

The Gist

Mix a little wet cat food (preferably a fish flavor) with some chunk light tuna and juice. Top with some dry kitty treats. Microwave briefly to heat.

Ingredients

2 Tb. wet cat food (preferably a fish flavor)
2 Tb. chunk light tuna in water with juice
2 tsp. dry kitty treats
a small, tasteful, ceramic bowl for serving

Method

Lightly mix together the wet cat food and chunk light tuna. Don't overmix so there are still nice chunks of tuna visible, and make sure you use the juice from the can (our cat thinks that's the best part!). Top with the dry kitty treat and microwave just enough to warm slightly, about 10-15 seconds at most. Serve immediately and be careful not to step on your cat while he or she is lunging for it.

Notes

After many trials, we've settled on Friskies Salmon Dinner for the wet cat food, but do go with whatever is your cat will consistently eat. Then you can buy in bulk to save money. I get Salmon Dinner by the case at Petco for about 30¢ a can. Likewise, chunk light tuna in water goes for about 60¢ a can at Costco. (Avoid the oil-packed variety for both you and your cat--it has way too much fat!).

There are lots varieties of dry kitty treats out there to go on top. Don't mix these in so they keep a nice contrasting crunchy texture with the wet food. My dear sister-in-law Sheri kindly buys us loads of Kitty Mousse Salmon treats--so much that I really don't know what they cost!

Kitty Pill Administration

Unfortunately, a fact of life with letting your kitty out in nice weather is he or she may get into a fight. Cats are highly territorial and, if another cat intrudes on your cat's domain, a scuffle may ensue (as recently happened with our cat--at our back door!). The problem is that sharp cat claws and teeth make tiny but deep puncture wounds which seal over quickly and are difficult even to locate, but which often become infected.

If a wound becomes infected, an abcess can form which will require draining by your vet (not fun). However, if antibiotics are commenced with 24 hour of a probable or possible fight wound, they will usually stop any infection from spreading.

The usual method of administering a pill to a kitty is to forcibly place it far enough in the back of her mouth that she swallows it rather than spitting it out. Having already had rather enough with the sharpness of our cat's teeth and the shortness of her temper, I came up with the following method to make it easy on all of us. She actually likes it so much she has no idea she's taking a pill!

Ingredients

2-3 small chunks of raw chicken liver
the pill

Method

Use a paring knife to cut 2 or 3 small chunks of liver (about half the size of a sugar cube). In one of the pieces, make a slit with the knife and insert the pill into the slit. Cat pills are small enough that you should be able to insert the pill entirely into the piece of liver.

Give to your cat immediately as the liquid of the liver will start to dissolve the pill.

Notes

Our cat readily consumes a much greater quantity of liver than this, but using only 2 or 3 chunks enures she wolfs them down before realizing there may be something there other than liver (antibiotics tend to be very bitter). Then she usually licks the bowl afterwards, so there's no worry that she didn't get all of it.

Bon appetit,
The Power Chef
40 Years Ago in The Nugget: March 1968
--by Jim Bauman, Notorious ex-editor of The Nugget (presently at large)


March Nug40

Well, last month's cover featured a snowbound 356 Cabriolet in the snow at Yosemite. In March, the editors continued to feature Yosemite on the cover with another picture from the 1967 Tour (the very first!) - with Yosemite Falls in the background.

Ah, here is a short note clarifying the policy regarding membership applications. It stated "It shall be the policy of the Golden Gate Region of the Porsche Club of America that membership applications will be distributed only by the Membership Director. The Membership Director shall distribute the applications only at P.C.A. events (preferably dinner meetings.)"  Wow... tough crowd!

Dwight Mitchell passed on a tech tip for lowering a Porsche or VW engine in order to remove it from the car.  Jack up the car as far as possible, slip a BIG block of ice under the engine, lower the car til the engine rests on the ice, remove the bolts securing the engine.... As the ice melts, the engine is lowered slowly to the ground. No mention on how to reverse the process.

Back to Yosemite... a two page ad beckons members to attend the 2nd annual Yosemite Tour. Hold on... $35 per couple? Oh, that includes a deluxe room at the lodge, gourmet dining and dancing at the Ahwahnee Hotel, all taxes and tips.  At first glance it did seem a little pricey...

GGR's geography back then was wide reaching. New members from San Jose, San Francisco, Inverness, and Walnut Creek were welcomed into the club.

The classifieds featured this:

1961 S-90 REUTTER CABRIOLET, Nassau Blue. John Williamson's 1967 Class "E" autocross champion. 4000 miles on new engine. 0.020 overbore balanced, chrome velocity stacks; BAEA gears; Koni shocks; 6 _ chrome shells with knock offs; 5.00 - 9.20 - 15 Blue Streak tires; front and rear sway bars; extractor and chrome stinger. Full white tonneau cover; chrome headlight stone guards. All new trim. Speedster seats; competition seat belts; cocoa mats front and rear; new interior paint and upholstery; leather steering wheel cover; AM/FM/SW Blaupunkt radio with dual speakers; custom nerf bars and/or bumpers; 3rd in concours at 1967 Sports Car Olympics. Ready to win Class "E" again in '68. Photo available on request. -- $3295.  Contact JOHN WILLIAMSON.

OK, here's a challenge. Is this car still in the Bay Area? Let me know.. I'll photograph it and include it in the next Nugget!

GGR Technical Bulletin

GGR TECH BULLETIN 2008-1

SUMMARY: Non-airbag cars may participate in GGR's Driver's Education (DE) events without installing multi-point safety harnesses.

AFFECTS: Driver's Education participants with non-airbag cars (meaning street cars that were delivered without airbags such as 914s, 911 SCs, 911 Carreras (84-89), etc.).

DETAILS: GGR adopted a new rule for 2008 that required non-airbag cars (as defined above) to employ multi-point harnesses in order to participate in Driver's Education events.  This new rule has been canceled, restoring the preparation requirements for non-airbag cars participating in DEs to the level present in 2007.  This change does not affect car preparation requirements for Time Trial participation.  This change does not override PCA National's requirement that multi-point harnesses be accompanied by appropriate seats. With this change, GGR is still in compliance with PCA National's Minimum DE Guidelines and is now in agreement with the requirements of other local PCA regions.

Members are reminded that safety gear should be in good working condition, is subject to tech inspection to ensure that is the case and that instructors have the right to refuse to ride in any car if they feel it would be unsafe.

If you have been affected by this change the DE/TT Chairman would like to know about it.  Please contact the chair at GGRTTChair@gmail.com to let him know.

Prepared by Andrew Forrest, 2008 GGR Driver's Education/Time Trial Chairman
on behalf of Dan Thompson, 2008 GGR Competition Director
Showroom Stock Classes Added to Autocross

Larry Adams
--by Larry Adams, Zone 7 Autocross Chair

The Showroom Stock autocross category instituted in 2007 for Zone events has been added to the Golden Gate Region rules for 2008. This class will allow owners of newer un-modified Porsches to compete against similar model and year cars. The points rules continue for older and for modified Porsches. The following is an outline of Showroom Stock specifications and classes.


Showroom Stock Specifications

OEM wheels and OEM tire sizes must be as originally specified. Tires must have a wear rating of at least 140. Cars must run with spare tire, jack, tools, owner's manual, etc. in place. No aftermarket equipment that could be reasonably perceived as performance enhancing is permitted.

Showroom Stock Classes
S.1:    All 968
S.2:    911 C2 (964: 1990-1994), C4 (964: 1989-1994) RS America (1993-1994)
S.3:    Boxster (986: 1997-2004)
S.4:    Boxster S (986: 2000-2004)
S.5:    Boxster (987: 2005-on), Cayman (2006-on)
S.6:    Boxster S (987: 2005-on), Cayman S (2006-on)
S.7:    911 Carrera (993: 1995-1998). All except Turbo
S.8:    911 Carrera (996: 1999-2005). All except Turbo, GT2, GT3
S.9:    911 Carrera (997: 2005-on). All except Turbo, GT2, GT3
S.10:    911 Turbo (965/993/996/997: 1991-on). All except GT2
S.11:    All Cayenne
S.12:    GT2, GT3, Carrera GT, all

Complete classification information will be available on the GGR website at www.pca-ggr.org/ and at registration at each autocross.

2008 Porsche Parade Registration
Hello and Greetings from Charlotte!

We, the Parade 2008 Team, would like to thank you for your continued interest in Porsche Parade 2008. As you have probably read in this months' PANORAMA we have a very exciting line-up of events in store for you here in the 'Queen City'.

At this time we would like to introduce the official Porsche Parade 2008 Website. It is now 'LIVE' and available for viewing at www.paradecharlotte.org.  Please feel free to explore the site and see what we have planned.  FYI - More information will be posted on the website as it becomes available.

*** Remember that Registration for the 2008 Porsche Parade opens at 9AM EST on Tuesday March 11th 2008 - Put it on your Calendar !!! ***

Thanks!

Harvey Yancey || Chair 
Porsche Parade 2008 - Charlotte
Carolinas Region
Porsche Club of America

http://www.paradecharlotte.org
New President of Porsche Cars North America
Detlev von Platen becomes new President and CEO of Porsche Cars North America


Stuttgart/Atlanta/Paris -- February 22, 2008 --  Dr. Ing. h.c. F. Porsche AG, Stuttgart, Germany, names two new executive managers in its two most important markets.  With the departure of Peter Schwarzenbauer (48) who has been named to the Management Board of Audi AG, in Ingolstadt, Germany, responsible for worldwide sales and marketing, the Executive Board of the Stuttgart-based sports car manufacturer has named Detlev von Platen (44) as the new President and CEO of Porsche Cars North America, based in Atlanta, Georgia. The new Managing Director of Porsche France in Boulogne Billancourt will be Felix Bräutigam (40).Porsche President

Detlev von Platen will take over the job in the USA from Peter Schwarzenbauer on April 1, 2008. Since 1997, the political and business economist born in France has been responsible for the Porsche brand and the development of the Porsche France sales subsidiary, established in 1999. Sales on the French market more than tripled under the management of von Platen, reaching 2,916 vehicles in 2007. The dealer network is now made up of 32 Porsche Centers, including subsidiaries in the future markets of Morocco and Tunisia. Before taking on his current position von Platen held various management positions in sales and marketing for BMW AG between 1988 and 1996.

In Atlanta von Platen will be responsible for a successful team of approximately 250 employees. Since taking on this job in March 2003, Peter Schwarzenbauer has further improved the high profile of Porsche in the USA through the consistent marketing of the brand as a premium supplier. He has ultimately been able to achieve record sales four times in a row on the largest Porsche market. In spite of a very difficult market environment plagued by cutthroat price wars between other manufacturers, the 212 dealer operations in North America were able to sell 36,680 vehicles throughout 2007. This represents approximately 38 percent of total global Porsche sales. Thanks to a pre-owned car program established in 2004, the North American Porsche dealers now sell 8,000 pre-owned Porsche vehicles with a works warranty.

Schwarzenbauer has been with Porsche AG since 1994. After occupying management positions in the German market, he took on the job of Managing Director of Porsche Ibérica in Madrid in 1997. Schwarzenbauer will begin his job at the Management Board of Audi AG responsible for worldwide sales and marketing on April 1, 2008.

Felix Bräutigam is to become the new Managing Director of Porsche France.  Since 2004, the business graduate and MBA has been responsible for the supervision of all Porsche sales subsidiaries and regional offices at the sales center in Ludwigsburg. Bräutigam, who came to Porsche in 1996 after studying in Germany and the USA, was previously employed as General Manager Marketing Communication.

Porsche expects its next big growth spurt in 2009, linked with the market launch of the four-door Gran Turismo Panamera. With Detlev von Platen and Felix Bräutigam, Porsche now has two experienced Porsche Managers at the helm of the sales subsidiaries in the USA and France ready to take on this challenge.

New 911 GT3 RSR
PORSCHE 911 GT3 RSR - MOST POWERFUL RACING 911 - SIGNIFICANTLY IMPROVED FOR 2008

ATLANTA - February 13 -- The Porsche 911 GT3 RSR launches into the new model year with extensive modifications, with its North American debut scheduled next month at the Mobil 1 Twelve Hours of Sebring - round one of the 2008 American Le Mans Series.

The most powerful race car based on the Porsche 911, which last year scored wins at the 24 hour races of Le Mans and Spa, the GT2 class win at Petit Le Mans at Road Atlanta, and an overall victory at the Nuerburgring 24 hours, competes in the GT2 class at international long distance races. The most distinguishing visual feature of the new GT3 RSR is the front end which received major improvements to the aerodynamics. The majority of innovations, however, are hidden under the weight-optimized body.

GT3 1

The first American team to announce that it will compete with the 2008 Porsche 911 GT3 RSR is the Sonoma, Calif.-based Flying Lizard Motorsports squad, which will enter the GT2 class of the American Le Mans Series with three of the new 911 race cars.  Porsche factory drivers Joerg Bergmeister, Wolf Henzler and Patrick Pilet will join veteran Darren Law and Lizard owners Seth Neiman, Lonnie Pechnik and [GGR member!] Johannes van Overbeek in the team's effort to win its first ALMS GT2 championship.

Other American Le Mans Series Porsche 911 GT3 RSR entrants plan to announce their plans and driver teams shortly.      

Aside from the additional spoilers on the front apron, new flicks, optimized air ducting with newly-designed side air outlets, generate more downforce and reduces drag. The rear end including the rear wing was taken from last year's race car. Extensive changes to the suspension dynamics increase mechanical grip considerably. The range of possible suspension set-ups have been increased.  

The 3.8-liter boxer engine of the GT3 RSR remains unchanged apart from slight improvements to details. It delivers 465 hp (342 kW) at 8,000 revs per minute and delivers a maximum torque of 430 Nm at 7,250 revs. The rev limiter of the efficient six-cylinder kicks in at 9,400 rpm.

GT3 2
 
Much of the know-how in the GT3 RSR's totally new gearbox has come from the Porsche RS Spyder LMP2 prototype. The sequential six-speed unit, developed by Porsche engineers, is considerably lighter than its predecessor. Internal friction was substantially reduced. The flat angle of the drive shafts allows teams a wider range of suspension set-ups.

Including the GT3 Cup and the GT3 Cup S, the GT3 RSR is the third race car based on the Porsche 911 offered by Porsche Motorsport. Thirty-five units of this fastest and most powerful 911 long distance racer are being produced in Porsche's R&D and Motorsports headquarters Weissach, Germany, and are currently being delivered to customer teams around the globe. The price of the GT3 RSR is 349,800 Euro plus VAT ($510,065 at one Euro = $1.45816).


Technical Specifications Porsche 911 GT3 RSR (2008)

Engine
  • Six-cylinder aluminium boxer engine, water-cooled;
  • 3,795 cc;
  • stroke 76.4 mm;
  • bore 102.7 mm;
  • 465 bhp (342 kW) at 8,000 rpm;
  • max. torque 430 Nm at 7,250 rpm;
  • air restrictors 2 x 29.5 mm;
  • maximum engine speed 9,400 rpm;
  • four valves per cylinder;
  • dry sump lubrication;
  • individual throttle butterflies;
  • central air intake;
  • electronic MS 4.0 engine management;
  • fuel injection;
  • fuel grade: RON 98 Super Plus unleaded; ALMS E-10 Ethanol mix
Power transmission
  • Six-speed gearbox with sequential jaw-type shift;
  • oil/water heat exchanger;
  • single-mass flywheel;
  • hydraulic disengagement lever;
  • three-plate carbon-fiber clutch;
  • rear wheel drive;
  • limited-slip differential 45/65 percent.
Body
  • Monocoque body (basis GT3 RS road car) of hot-galvanised steel;
  • aerodynamically optimized front end with front spoiler;
  • aerodynamically optimised front underfloor;
  • adjustable rear wing;
  • 90-litre safety fuel tank with fast filling function;
  • air jack;
  • welded-in safety cage;
  • bucket-type racing seat (on driver's side only) with flame-resistant seat cover; six-point seat belt adapted for use of the HANS Head and Neck Support;
  • electric fire-extinguishing system.

GT3 3

Suspension
Front:
  • McPherson spring strut axle;
  • Sachs four-way gas pressure dampers;
  • double coil springs (main and ancillary spring);
  • front axle arms adjustable for camber;
  • adjustable sword-type anti-roll bar on both sides;
  • power steering.
Rear:
  • Multi-arm axle with rigidly mounted axle sub-frame;
  • Sachs four-way gas pressure dampers;
  • double coil springs (main and auxiliary spring);
  • rear axle tie-bar reinforced and infinitely adjustable;
  • adjustable sword-type anti-roll bar on both sides.
  • Complete suspension infinitely adjustable (height, camber, track).

Brakes
Brake system with balance bar control.

Front:
  • Single-piece six-piston aluminium fixed callipers;
  • inner-vented, 380 mm in diameter;
  • racing brake pads.
Rear:
  • Single-piece four-piston aluminium fixed callipers;
  • inner-vented, 355 mm in diameter;
  • racing brake pads.
Wheels
  • Front: Three-piece BBS light-alloy wheels (11J x 18-34); central bolt;
  • Rear: Three-piece BBS light-alloy wheels (13J x 18-12.5); central bolt.
Electrical System

Motec display with integrated data recording; adjustable traction control; battery: 12 volt, 50 Ah, 140 Ah alternator.

Weight

Approx. 1,225 kg complying with A.C.O. regulations;
1,200 kg complying with FIA regulations.

Photos, courtesy Porsche Cars North America, are available here.


Porsche Driver Fitness Boot Camp in Africa
Porsche Factory Drivers Finish Fitness Camp on Fuerteventura Island

Mobil 1 Twelve Hours of Sebring Will Test Their Endurance

ATLANTA - February 19 -- At a ten day intensive fitness camp on Spanish-owned Fuerteventura Island (off Africa), Timo Bernhard (26 years-old), Romain Dumas (30), Sascha Maassen (38), Patrick Long (26), Joerg Bergmeister (32), Wolf Henzler (32), Patrick Pilet (26), Marc Lieb (27), Richard Lietz (24), Richard Westbrook (32) and Emmanuel Collard (36) have worked hard on their power and endurance. Porsche-UPS junior driver Martin Ragginger (19) also took part in the Porsche Fitness Camp under the direction of sport medicine specialist Prof. Dr. Frank Mayer from the Potsdam University.

Porsche factory drivers Bernhard, Dumas, Maassen and Long will all join Penske Racing for the 2008 American Le Mans Series (ALMS) season in the Porsche RS Spyder LMP2 prototypes, while Bergmeister, Henzler and Pilet will run for the year with Flying Lizard Motorsports with the ALMS GT2 class in Porsche 911 GT3 RSRs.  Collard will join the Penske group as an additional driver for the upcoming Mobil 1 Twelve Hours of Sebring.

The twelve Porsche pilots trained seven hours a day in a fitness studio and outside. In addition to power and endurance training the fitness schedule also included various exercises to improve their speed, flexibility and coordination.

"The drivers have stuck to the individual training schedules that I put together for them in December 2007. They turned up here at our fitness camp well prepared. Even the newer Porsche works pilots were at an excellent fitness level," said Prof. Dr. Mayer about his protégés.

Porsche camp

"For this reason we were able to again increase the intensity of the programme compared to last year," added the sport medicine specialist.

"The combination of power training, various forms of endurance training and team building exercises has given my fitness level a noticeable boost," says Timo Bernhard (Germany), the reigning LMP2 co-champion of the American Le
Mans Series.

"At the same time the first race in Sebring is the most physically demanding of the season. The fast corners put a huge strain on the neck and the bumps put an extra stress on the head and back," adds his teammate and co-champion Romain Dumas (France).

American Patrick Long, who contests his first full ALMS season in the Porsche RS Spyder this year, also feels optimally prepared.

"Even now I notice a big improvement in my fitness. Apart from that I've got a lot of ideas for my personal fitness schedule during the coming season."

Long's teammate Sascha Maassen (Germany) underlines another positive aspect of their training.

"The new works drivers Richard Westbrook, Wolf Henzler and Patrick Pilet have integrated well into our squad. The many team-building games we've played have helped tremendously with this."



New Cayenne GTS
from Porsche AG

GTS to Offer the Best on-Road Characteristics of Any Cayenne Porsche

ATLANTA -- Porsche will add some spice to the 100th anniversary of the Chicago Auto Show by unveiling the Cayenne GTS to the American public. Already known for exceptional on and off-road prowess, the GTS has been formulated, tested and tweaked to offer the best on-road characteristics of any Cayenne Porsche has ever produced.

The Cayenne GTS features a 405hp 4.8 liter V-8 engine. Based on the same V8 found in the Cayenne S, this more robust powerplant can be coupled either with an automatic Tiptronic S or, for the first time in a Cayenne V8, a six-speed manual transmission for those who want to take full advantage of this new power and suspension package. The GTS gets its cornering prowess from standard 21-inch alloy rims equipped with 295/35 R21 tires and air suspension that features Porsche Active Suspension Management (PASM).

Cayenne GTS

The Cayenne GTS front end is reminiscent of the Cayenne Turbo while the body has a lower stance and a striking new wheel-arch design that complements the new 21-inch rims. The interior boasts redesigned front and rear seats that offer a sportier look and feel with Alcantara to hold both driver and passenger in place during spirited driving.

The 2008 Cayenne GTS goes on sale in February and pricing for this new model is US $69,300.

Porsche Cars North America, Inc. (PCNA), based in Atlanta, Ga., and its subsidiary, Porsche Cars Canada, Ltd., are the exclusive importers of Porsche sports cars and Cayenne sport utility vehicles for the United States and Canada. A wholly owned, indirect subsidiary of Dr. Ing.h.c. F. Porsche AG, PCNA employs approximately 250 people who provide Porsche vehicles, parts, service, marketing and training for its 212 U.S. and Canadian dealers. They, in turn, provide Porsche owners with best-in-class service.
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That will do it for March. Hope that's enough to read! (It sure seemed like a lot putting it together--or maybe it's just the sinus infection!).  See you at the March autocross.

As always, thanks for reading.
John Celona
Porsche Club of America-Golden Gate Region
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Porsche Club of America--Golden Gate Region | Nugget Headquarters | 505 Vista Ave | San Carlos | CA | 94070
Begin forwarded message:

From: John Celona <nugget-ed@sbcglobal.net>
Subject: From Porsche Club of America--Golden Gate Region
Date: April 2, 2008 3:11:16 PM PDT

earth dayGGR Logo
Porsche Club of America
Golden Gate Region




April, 2008 - Vol 48, Number 4
In This Issue
President's Message
Letter from the Editor
Competition Corner
Feb. Membership
Board of Directors
2008 DE Schedule
The Power Chef
40 Years Ago in the Nugget
Porsche Roads
Car Clinic for New Drivers
2008 Parade Registration
Crab 34
Zone 7 Autocrosses
Snake Eyes Rally
Zone AX#3
Topless Concours
Yosemite Region Concours
LPR Swap & Concours
Quick Links
Dear Porsche Enthusiast,

Welcome to The Nugget, the email newsletter of the Golden Gate Region, Porsche Club of America.
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If you have any trouble viewing this email, you can click here to go to the archive of PDF versions of this newsletter. For comments or feedback, click here to email the editor.

Thanks for reading.
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Pawlina Paraskova CG
Executive Editor of The Nugget
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President's Message
Bill Dally--by Bill Dally, GGR President

Finding the line

As an autocross instructor I often see a student who is pushing their car very hard, driving right at the limit, having a great time - but not getting a low time.  The problem, of course, is that they have cranked up their speed without first finding the right line.  The line here refers to the exact path a car takes through an autocross or road course and the right line is the one that gets the car through the course in the least amount of time.  To drive well, you must first find the right line, and only then start dialing up the speed to the point where your car control skills find their limits.  The driver who keeps pushing without backing off and finding the line will ultimately find themselves frustrated when they see that people who clearly aren't driving as fast (or at least not sliding the rear end out as much) are getting lower times.

Finding the right line is more of an issue in autocross.  Our road courses don't change and so over the course of time there is general agreement as to what the right line is on a road course for a particular type of car and you can find course guides and videos that demonstrate driving the right line (and even discussing the few popular variants - do you double apex turn 2 - at Laguna or Thunderhill?).  Each autocross, however, is a new course and a new line to be found.  For a few courses it is a challenge to just find a legal line - that doesn't result in a DNF (did not finish) - but for most courses the challenge is to find the fastest line.

The fastest line is rarely the shortest path around a course.  Rather its is the path that widens the turns in a manner that allows the car to carry the most speed through critical parts of the course - and in particular enables the car to carry the most speed into the longer straights where the higher velocity is integrated over a considerable distance.

On some courses the right line is pretty obvious.  These courses tend to have individual turns separated by straights.  The right line consists of starting at the outside of every turn, getting as close to the apex cone as you can without knocking it over or out of the box, and then accelerating out of the turn using all of the available room.  The free variable here is where you apex the turn (where you get the closest to the inside edge of the turn).  If there is room left over at the exit - apex earlier - if you have to back off the throttle at the exit - apex later.

The harder courses are ones where turns are linked together so that a fast line around one turn requires sacrificing the turn before or after.  Optional slaloms (where the direction you pass the first cone is optional) can also complicate finding the right line.  Leaving the first cone to the left may favor entering the slalom while leaving it to the right favors exiting the slalom.  You need to figure out which is strategically more important.

Find the right line at an autocross - as in life - involves planning, foresight, reflection, and experience.  The planning process starts with the course walk in the morning.  As you walk the course, do two things.  First, draw a map.  This will help fix the course in your mind and will also give you something to refer to later in the reflection stage.  Second envision your car negotiating each feature (turn, slalom, or gate) and decide (a) where to turn in, (b) at what point you apex the turn, (c) where you exit, and (d) where you should be looking.  It may help to number the features and write down these four points (at least where they are non obvious) for each feature.  It sometimes helps to turn around and look backward through a feature to see if the path that seemed very smooth forward looks as good backward.

Foresight comes in when you drive the course.  The single thing you can do to improve your line is to look ahead.  Many "line problems" stem from a driver fixating on the current feature - I've got to hit this apex - and then upon arriving at the feature looking up and realizing that the car is not pointed in the right direction to get to the next feature.  This can be avoided by always looking one or two features ahead.  Once you turn in, ignore the apex and look to the exit.  As you approach the apex look past the exit to the next turn.  For linked turns you may even be looking to the exit of the next turn or the one after that.  Looking ahead causes your brain to compute a smooth path to the point you are looking at.  Driving to one point and then looking up to the next point results in a jerky - and slow - connect the dots path.

Reflection is what you do between your runs and during your rest period.  In addition to socializing, drive the course over in your mind - and critique your line.  Look at your map and find the longest straights.  Are you getting the fastest launch into them?  What could you do on the turns before the straights to carry more speed on exit.  Go through each feature and ask yourself if your line could be improved.   Make some notes on your map about what to do differently next time.  You will quickly find that driving the course a few times in your head is almost as good as taking a lap in the car.

Experience takes two forms: your own and others.  As you become more experienced yourself you will start to see the right line without thinking about it as much.  At the same time, you can learn from the experience of others.  Watch the lines that the top drivers take and ask them why they are taking a particular approach.   Ask to take a ride with them (if they are an instructor) or to have them ride along with you and critique your line.  Under their mentorship you will wind up learning a lot faster than if you left it to trial and error. 

Most of what I have said above about finding the right line on an autocross course applies to life as much as it does to driving.  Instead of the turns, slaloms, and apexes of an autocross course, in life we deal with decisions, jobs, and relationships.  While completely different, the same principles of planning, foresight, reflection, and experience apply.  I see many friends who are working very hard but not getting to where they want to be.  To avoid their trap, back off on the speed a bit and find the right line.  Start with planning - draw up a "map" with goals, decision points, and options.  As you execute your plan, look ahead - just like on the course - to see the effects of a decision a few months - or years - down the road.   Take time to reflect (odd how working too hard can interfere with this).  Periodically revisit your map and update it.  Critique your own decisions.  And finally, take advantage of the experience of others.  Cultivate a few mentors whose experience can help you progress faster than you could on your own.   Pretty soon you will see your times coming down - and goals being achieved.

Finding the right line is also an issue for the club.  We (the club) need to make decisions about how to evolve our existing time-trial and autocross series.  Our long running debate on time-trial safety rules and our search for a long-term autocross site are examples of the issues we face.  We also need to plan new types of events and find ways of better serving the needs of our evolving membership.  In addition to the four points above, to find the right line as a club, we also need two things from you the members.  First, we need your ideas.  If you have feedback on our existing events or ideas for new events or services, please contact me (at ggrpresident@gmail.com) or the board (ggr-board@pca-ggr.org).  Second, we need your help.  We are an all volunteer organization.  Get involved.  You will find that its rewarding and a great way to get to know some great people.

Bill
Jerry WoodsSmart Racing
Letter from the Editor
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--by John Celona, Nugget Editor

May Be a Late Nugget

My apologies if this month's Nugget arrives in your inbox a bit later than you're used to. Work has been rather busy lately. I'm actually writing this on an airplane, but, unfortunately, actually putting the Nugget together requires Internet access to the service's web based tools. Possibly I could risk turning on my wireless card without crashing the plane, but there's far too much tread remaining on my tires to risk it.

What! No Historian?

My call for a GGR Historian last month appears to have fallen on deaf (busy?) ears. A few folks volunteered to make their back issues of the Nugget available for the purpose of creating an electronic archive of them, and thanks very much to those folks for stepping forward.

Perhaps a clarification would help. I used the term "GGR Historian" only because that term appears in the GGR Redbook, which is the repository of all the club history and procedures we are trying not to lose track of.

However, we presently have and are only considering one task: taking the lead in creating an electronic archive of back issues of The Nugget. After that task is completed, the lucky candidate can have their name recorded in that same Redbook for all posterity and enjoy an early retirement party.

For some number of years going back, assembling the electronic archive will only require assembling PDF versions of The Nugget which already exist but are not all in one place. At some point, scanning old issues in paper form would be required. It is an open question (on which the candidate may certainly opine!) how much and in what manner to undertake scanning. An  easy, cheap solution would be attractive. Too much time and money would argue against taking that road. Yes, the club is prepared to provide some financial support for this task, and, no, how much has not been decided.

There are two reasons for trying to get a complete, electronic Nugget archive. First, we have hopes of obviating the need for GGR's rented storage area, which is currently costing the club $1,200 per year. Although we've not yet entirely excavated the storage area, we expect that back issues of The Nugget will be a large part of what's there.

Second, our super new webmaster Paul Larson advises that enormous storage is available at low cost with our new web site hosting service. He further promises to put at least some of the back issue online. Members would then have the opportunity to peruse back issues at their leisure. As the monthly column by our nefarious past editor Jim Bauman shows, more than a few yucks and escaped bargains are lurking there.

Sadly, of course, success in this project might raise a question about the continued vitality of Mr. Bauman's column. Not to worry. I have complete confidence in his editorial ability to extract the "nuggets" each month and save readers the trouble.

If you're interested, do email me and, as always, thanks for reading.

John
CommCovRennwerks
Competition Corner
Thompson--by Dan Thompson, Competition Director

All righty folks.  Spring is now officially here and it is time to drag your garage queen out and participate in one of GGR's many competitive events.  Our first AX of the 2008 season was a success.  We are back at Alameda Point, albeit at a new site.  We are on runway 725, which is very long and very narrow.  For those of you that came out to the first AX of the season, thank you for participating.  It was a bit wet and cool in the early morning, but by 10am or so it was nice a dry, with a party sunny sky. 

There has been some discussion about the course, I will take all the responsibility for your enjoyment or lack thereof. It is just an AX and the next one will be different.  It was the first time any of us had  actually set foot on the venue and we weren't sure what we would have.  Expect all the courses for now, to be similar, although a bit less twisty. We should be purchasing a new wireless timing system, with a repeater.  This will enable us to do a long one way course, giving us the entire 200' width to make a very enjoyable, less twisty, course. Don't forget our next AX will be at Alameda on April 12, make sure to come out and give it a try, or at least come out and watch and say hello  to some friends.

Our next Time Trial will be at Thunderhill on April 18, 19 and 20th.  Yes, that is right, THREE days of track driving.  Should be a fun long weekend. 

On the "rules" front, there should be a Technical Bulletin issued in the next week or so concerning the big subject of the off season.  Yes, we should finally have a closure to the Seats/Belts/Harness situation for DE and TT cars.  Stay tuned.  PCA National has approved Minimum TT Standards that were proposed and pushed thru by our very own Larry Sharp.  Thank you Larry for seeing this issue thru to it's completion. As soon as the GGR Board has had time to discuss these new standards we should be able to finally put this to rest for this season.

OK, weather is getting nice so get out and drive that Porsche.

Dan
European Autotech
February Membership Report
--by Jeff Kost, Membership DirectorJeff Kost

Total Members:  2523
Primary:            1477
Affiliate:            1045
Life:                       1
New Members:      24
Transfers In:         33
Transfers Out:        2




New Members

Laurie & Kurt Delimon

 

San Jose

Jason & Evelyn Derderian

San Francisco

2005 Boxster

Eric Ebbel

Hillsborough

1968 912

Charles Faulk

Redwood City

1984 911

Robert Faust

Redwood City

1977 911 Turbo

Nina Feero

Half Moon Bay

 

Bruno & Becki Filice

Foster City

2002 996 TT

Jason & Jocelyne Gardner

Oakland

2007 997 C4S

David & Susan Haase

Moss Beach

2004 Carrera 4S

Jeffrey Harris

Los Altos

1985 911

David Harrison

San Francisco

2006 911 C4S

Dennis Jacobson

Clayton

2001 Boxster

Vivek Jain

Cupertino

2008 911 Turbo

Candace Kirsch

Redwood City

 

Noel Lara

San Carlos

 

Derek Lee

San Francisco

2008 911

James Lee

Orinda

2007 Cayman S

Julian Lighton

Portola Valley

2008 911 4s

Stuart & Caroline Marshall

Los Gatos

2005 Boxster

Nils Mattisson

Mountain View

2002 Boxster

Todd Mckenna

San Francisco

2003 Carrera 4S

Scot Plewacki

San Francisco

1987 911

James Stubbe

San Jose

 

Victor & Loren Viegas

Atherton

2004 911

Marvin Weitz

Santa Clara

1982 911 SC

James Yee

San Jose

2004 911 GT3

Paul Yeh

Sunnyvale

2008 911

Jeff Yu

San Jose

 

 Anniversaries

 40 Years

Richard Wallace

Los Altos

1987 944s

 20 Years

Stanmore Cooper

San Francisco

1970 914

 15 Years

Anita Cullinan

Hollister

 10 Years

Thomas Ahlberg

Greenbrae

1996 993 TT

Jim Montalbano

Montara

1998 911

Doug Ostler

Alamo

1997 986

Pamela Reitman

San Francisco

 

Dietrich Schulze

Pleasanton

1991 944

Debbi Waterstone

Los Gatos

 

 5 Years

Dan Child

Half Moon Bay

1999 996

David Chune

San Francisco

1984 911

Thomas Dinkel

San Francisco

1967 911 Coupe

Tyler Gage

Orinda

 

David Ledford

Fairfield

1982 911 SC

Lisa Murad

San Ramon

 

Tracy Paugh

Belmont

 

Roger Peacock

Bolinas

1987 911 Carrera

Bev Prowell

Lafayette

 

Mary Stanton

Alameda

 

Annette Stringos

Hamburg

 

Ron Wong

San Carlos

2003 Boxster Ca

Charkene Xuereb-Yovino

Union City

 

Rick Zobelein

San Mateo

2003 911

Paul Goldman

Redwood City

1973 914

Alex Kilgo

San Francisco

1991 C2 Turbo

Jean-Francois Vincent

Cupertino

2000 Boxster

BPS Repro
Board of Directors
Celona--by John Celona, GGR Secretary



Due to the heavy travel schedule of many folks, the March board meeting has been rescheduled to the first week of April. We'll catch it in next month's Nugget.
Club Sportiva
2008 Drivers' Ed & Time Trial Schedule
TT banner
 










  Sat Mar 29, '08   Ground School Round Table Pizza, Concord

  Apr 18-20, '08   Driver's Ed & Time Trial #2 Thunderhill

  Sat May 3, '08   Ground School Round Table Pizza, Concord

  May 24-25, '08   Driver's Ed & Time Trial #3 Buttonwillow

  Sat Jul 26, '08   Ground School Round Table Pizza, Concord

  Aug 16-17, '08   Driver's Ed & Time Trial #4 Thunderhill

  Sat Aug 30, '08   Ground School Round Table Pizza, Concord

  Sep 20-21, '08   Driver's Ed & Time Trial #5 Thunderhill

The Power Chef
NE Bike
Food on the Road

--by John Celona, The Power Chef

No, I don't mean eating food lying on the road (unless you have a taste for venison and are sure the dearly departed deer is fresh!). I mean eating while traveling, especially while traveling for business.

Certainly, traveling for business has been reliable formula for bringing a more "prosperous" form to your physique. Meals are often late, involve entertaining clients and colleagues with caloric (read "alcoholic") beverages. With charging the meal to the company, it's tempting to indulge.

Tipping the balance even more in the wrong direction, time and facilities for exercise are often extremely limited. Working, entertaining, and trying to catch up on sleep to cope with jet lag easily consume entire days. And even if you're awake and can't sleep at 1 a.m. because it's some entirely unrelated time at home, who wants or is able to exercise at 1 a.m.?  (See my past column on finding exercise facilities while on the road.)

The issue isn't just the oddness of the hour. Traveling and loss of sleep severely tax one's energy level and body. Trying to do too much can easily lead to an injury that turns a difficult trip into an ordeal.

So I fall back on one of my strategies that's simple enough to remember without the organizer: Balance what you take in with what you put out.

On the road, that means I'll just exercise as much as I have time and opportunity for and not worry about the missed workouts. Consistency at home gives you leeway to miss a few workouts on the road without sacrificing your fitness or form.

But, with reduced physical activity (no, pressing the button to change the PowerPoint slide does not count!), watching the calories becomes even more important, along with really trying to eat right.

Accordingly, here are my tried-and-true strategies for managing diet and calorie consumption on the road. They've worked for me for enough years to still fit into the clothes from the 80's(!), but, since everyone is different, feel free to develop variations for yourself.

1. Stay at a hotel with a free continental breakfast. Many "business oriented" hotels have these, and they're easier to find than you might think. Check the hotel's web site for information. Even in hotels which don't offer this to everybody, there is often some sort of a club or executive floor which does offer this. The extra cost for these rooms is often comparable to what you'd spend for breakfast and is peanuts compared to what you're probably paying for air fare, so justifying the extra expense isn't so hard.

The great advantage of staying somewhere with a free continental breakfast is you can grab some fairly healthy food and bring it back to your room to munch on without investing a lot of time in doing so. Last week, I grabbed a big plate of fresh fruit (decimating the grapefruit slices--sorry!), and snagged a whole wheat bagel of all things with a little lean ham and some cheese. A perfectly acceptable light breakfast under the circumstances. One just needs to pass on the donuts, bacon, and the like.

The extra time means you can sleep in a little later without taking the time for breakfast, or even, in my case, sneaking out for a brief early morning workout. Thirty minutes on the treadmill in the morning while traveling is a whole lot better than nothing at all, and I still had time to shower, dress, and pack while munching, then make it to my 8:30 a.m. meeting on time.

Plus, these sorts of places often have a fruit bowl set out for in between time that you can snack on. I consume as much fresh fruit as I feel like. No harm in that.

2. Look for Salad bars & Entrée salads. Lots of places have salad bars where one can either order separately or along with an entrée. And, if not, chicken Caesar salads seem to be universal. I'll often dine on just the salad bar. There're not what I would usually have for a meal at home, but healthy versions of full-on meals (like the recipes you've seen here) are  very hard to come by. At least with a salad bar you'll get a lot of nutritious greens and fiber as part of your meal.

Be sure to throw on lots of green peas, green beans, kidney beans, garbonzo beans or the like if available. I'll often add a decent topping of some calorific stuff (blue cheese dressing and bacon bits, for example) to give it flavor and make the salad more filling. It's your dinner, after all. Oil and vinegar dressings I avoid because they have as many calories as the blue cheese and usually lack flavor. And the "fat-free" dressings are typically loaded with sugar or sugar substitute and taste simply dreadful.

If by some chance the salad bar has some whole wheat bread (not as unusual as it used to be, though without a label you can't be sure how "whole" the wheat is!), include some by all means. I'll usually dip the bread in the dressing and skip the butter.

3. Order carefully. If you're ordering a sit-down meal because there's no salad bar or it would be awkward to order when others are ordering off the menu, pick your selections carefully. The baby back ribs and New York Sirloin are likely to be loaded with fat, and you won't get the benefit of the fat editing you could do at home. French onion soup is likely to be topped with hundreds of calories worth of cheese on top of buttered and grilled bread.

On the whole, it's just common sense: avoid fried foods, heavy sauces, and anything that looks loaded with fat while being light on fruits, vegetables, or whole grains. Pizza is almost always a bad choice from a dietary standpoint: Lots of fat in the cheese and toppings, token amounts of tomato, and a fiber-free white crust. Likewise for most fast foods, though McDonald's salads have come in handy for me many a time.

4. Less is More (Healthy!). Unfortunately, when you don't have much time to exercise, the amount of food you need to take in to sustain yourself is less that what it takes to make you feel really full. Plus you don't have the option of making the kind of totally satisfying, tasty, and healthy fare I fill up with at home. (Disregard this if you're one of those people who can eat and eat and not gain weight. And I hate you.) (Kidding!)

For me, this means I have to really watch quantities when my food choices are limited. If the only choice for lunch is a fatty panini sandwich on white bread, I have to take a really hard look at whether I want one (or maybe a half). Any other possible choices? If not, I'll maybe eat a half so I don't fall over and not worry about it. In a true emergency (such is being in the middle of nowhere and a long time till the next opportunity), I've even been known to have two or three pieces of Kentucky Fried Chicken. The long-term average is what really counts. Or I may take a careful look at how long until I get to the airport and can maybe get a turkey sandwich on whole wheat.

Hopefully, this gives you a few things to think about in keeping your size together while on the road. If all else fails, just consider what yummy stuff will be waiting for you when you get home. As I write this, I'm about to venture forth to see what the hotel restaurant has to offer. But I have a chicken at home marinating in the fridge, just waiting to be barbecued when I get home. I can't wait!

Bon appetit,
The Power Chef
40 Years Ago in The Nugget: March 1968
--by Jim Bauman, Notorious ex-editor of The Nugget (presently at large)


40 yrs April

The cover this month featured a lineup of GGR members' cars at the Cotati Driver's School held March 17th.

To arms! To arms! The British (cars) are coming! And the German cars, and the Italian cars, and the french cars, and the American cars... They're coming to Pleasanton on Sunday April 28th to Gegen Die Uhr VI, Golden Gate Region's NCSCC Championship Autocross!  (Gegen Die Uhr = "against the clock")

New members included Clark Anderson of San Jose (presently residing in Sonora and known as "Mr. 356!")

Speaking of the Anderson brothers, Bruce Anderson ran the following ad in the WANTED section:

356 low type SPEEDSTER top. Speedster HEADLIGHT GRILLS. Spyder MIRROR. Contact Bruce Anderson... Palo Alto, CA.

Bruce, are you still looking for that Spyder mirror?
Porsche Roads

Leglise2--by Claude Leglise, GGR Past President


San Jose to Freedom



In our on-going quest to stay off boring freeways and explore local back roads, this month's installment of Porsche Roads takes us south from San Jose toward Monterey and the Pacific Ocean.


From San Jose, take the Almaden Expressway and go to its very southernApr Roads1 end. You will reach a T intersection, where you make a right onto Harry Road and then immediately turn left on to McKean, a 2-lane road and the true start of our trip. As soon as you leave the last housing development, McKean takes you back to earlier and quieter days in the eastern foothills of the Santa Cruz Mountains.
The rolling hills are green this time of year, cattle enjoy the new grass, and wildflowers are sprouting everywhere. The first point of interest is Calero County Park, which offers boating and quiet hiking trails from which you can see great views of Mount Hamilton. About a mile south of the park, McKean becomes Uvas Road and follows the contour of Uvas Creek. There are not too many curves, but there is seldom much traffic, especially on a week day, so it makes for good driving. Uvas reservoir is another popular boating spot in the summer, and I understand the fishing is good, too. I just cannot put fishing rods inside the 911.

At the end of Uvas Road, turn right onto Watsonville Road and you enter the Gilroy wine country. The first winery you encounter is Sycamore Creek, then in succession: Kirigin, Thomas Kruse, Fortino, and Hecker Pass Winery. If one of you is a designated driver, you may want to pull over and sample some of the fine local production of Charbono, Carignan, Cabernet, Chardonnay and many more varieties. 


At the end of Watsonville Road is another T intersection. Turn right on to Hecker Pass Road, also known as Highway 152, and prepare for the curviest part of this trip. As you head west, the road soon enters the redwood forest in Mount Madonna County Park and starts climbing the southern end of the Santa Cruz Mountains. The pavement is smooth and, if you are lucky enough not to get caught behind a slow truck, the curves make a Boxster sing. Past the summit, the road descends rapidly toward Watsonville. There are several places to pull over and enjoy the terrific views of Monterey and the entire Bay. You can stop at the Mt Madonna Inn for a drink and a bite (if it is open). For the history buffs, the pass is named after Henry Hecker who built a road to connect Yosemite to the Pacific Ocean in the 1920s. 

Apr Roads2

At the bottom of the mountain, 152 enters the Pajaro River valley and its rich agricultural lands. Unfortunately, the Pajaro River has the dubious distinction of being listed as the most endangered river in America, as flood control aficionados want to line its natural bed with concrete and eliminate all vegetation and animal life.  Drive a couple of miles, go through Interlaken, and turn right on Holohan Road. Another mile or so, past Green VApr Roads4alley Road, and you reach our destination for today: Freedom, California.

Janis Joplin sang: "Freedom's just another word for nothing left to lose." Truth be told, there is not much happening in Freedom on a Saturday afternoon, and Janis may have been inspired by this Santa Cruz county town. Freedom is known worldwide thanks to KPIG radio, available to millions on the Internet at www.kpig.com. It was one of the first radio stations in the world to webcast its programming, as early as 1995. If nothing else, you will be able to tell your friends and coworkers that you have been to Freedom. What a cool name for a town!


Claude




cale: 1 to 5

Twistiness

Pavement quality

Scenery

McKean/Uvas Road

Watsonville Road

Hecker Pass Road



Apr Roads3
GGR Car Control Clinic for New Drivers

Mark your calendars: Saturday, June 14, 2008, from 7:30 until 4:00, GGR will hold a car control clinic for new drivers on the parking lot of Monster Park (a.k.a. Candlestick). 
This clinic is designed for beginner drivers, age 16 to 19, with a valid driver's license (sorry, no driver permits). The intent of the clinic is to help beginners become safer and more confident drivers through knowledge and experience. We will accept more experienced drivers who want a refresher, space permitting. Priority will be given to teenagers. This is a great opportunity for members' children or younger siblings to learn about their car's behavior in a controlled environment.

The clinic will cover the following:

Lecture Topics
  • Seating position
  • Hand position
  • Vision
  • Mental preparation
  • Car dynamics theory
  • Car maintenance check
Driving Exercises
  • Skidpad
  • Emergency Braking
  • Slalom/Swerve
  • Double Box
Each student will get in-car instruction from an experienced GGR instructor.
The emphasis of this clinic is car control, not racing. In that spirit, most car makes and models will be allowed to participate. No trucks, SUVs and vans allowed. Cayennes welcome. If you are uncertain, please email the event Chairmen beforehand, their decision will be final. The event is limited to 50 students.
 
Registration Procedure

Registration is not yet open at this time, watch email announcements and the May Nugget. Registration will be handled online via the MotorsportReg Online Driving Event Registration website. If you do not have an account, you will need to create one. This single account will allow you to register for PCA and other car club events.

If you are between the ages of 16-18, please click here to get the form, print it out, have parent and student sign it, and mail it to Howard Yao or bring it the morning of the event. Without this form, you will not be allowed to drive and there will be no refund.

 Cost: $99 a person, includes lunch

Event Chairmen: Claude Leglise and Howard Yao.

2008 Porsche Parade Registration
Hello and Greetings from Charlotte!

We, the Parade 2008 Team, would like to thank you for your continued interest in Porsche Parade 2008. As you have probably read in this months' PANORAMA we have a very exciting line-up of events in store for you here in the 'Queen City'.

At this time we would like to introduce the official Porsche Parade 2008 Website. It is now 'LIVE' and available for viewing at www.paradecharlotte.org.  Please feel free to explore the site and see what we have planned.  FYI - More information will be posted on the website as it becomes available.

*** Remember that Registration for the 2008 Porsche Parade opens at 9AM EST on Tuesday March 11th 2008 - Put it on your Calendar !!! ***

Thanks!

Harvey Yancey || Chair 
Porsche Parade 2008 - Charlotte
Carolinas Region
Porsche Club of America

http://www.paradecharlotte.org
Crab 34
Crab34
Zone 7 Autocrosses
Stompin I
Snake Eyes Rally
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Zone AX#3
Zone 7 AXs
Topless Concours
Concours Beach
Yosemite Region Concours
YR Concours Ad
LPR Swap & Concours
LPR swapmeet
Okay, we've made it through April. Look for May coming from an airplane near you!

As always, thanks for reading.
John Celona
Porsche Club of America-Golden Gate Region
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Porsche Club of America--Golden Gate Region | Nugget Headquarters | 505 Vista Ave | San Carlos | CA | 94070
Begin forwarded message:

From: John Celona <nugget-ed@sbcglobal.net>
Subject: From Porsche Club of America--Golden Gate Region
Date: April 30, 2008 7:30:35 PM PDT

Mom dayGGR Logo
Porsche Club of America
Golden Gate Region




May, 2008 - Vol 48, Number 5
In This Issue
Car Clinic for New Drivers
Beginners AX School
President's Message
Letter from the Editor
Competition Corner
Membership Report
Board of Directors
2008 DE Schedule
The Power Chef
Porsche Roads
The Carolina Trophy
2008 Parade Registration
Snake Eyes Rally
Yosemite Region Concours
Zone AX#3
Topless Concours
LPR Swap & Concours
Quick Links
Dear Porsche Enthusiast,

Welcome to The Nugget, the email newsletter of the Golden Gate Region, Porsche Club of America.
Alameida big
If you have any trouble viewing this email, you can click here to go to the archive of PDF versions of this newsletter. For comments or feedback, click here to email the editor.

Thanks for reading.
Join Our Mailing List!
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Pawlina









Pawlina Paraskova CG
Executive Editor of The Nugget
GGR Car Control Clinic for New Drivers

Mark your calendars: Saturday, June 14, 2008, from 7:30 until 4:00, GGR will hold a car control clinic for new drivers on the parking lot of Monster Park (a.k.a. Candlestick). 

This clinic is designed for beginner drivers, age 16 to 19, with a valid driver's license (sorry, no driver permits). The intent of the clinic is to help beginners become safer and more confident drivers through knowledge and experience. We will accept more experienced drivers who want a refresher, space permitting. Priority will be given to teenagers. This is a great opportunity for members' children or younger siblings to learn about their car's behavior in a controlled environment.

The clinic will cover the following:

Lecture TopicsCar control
  • Seating position
  • Hand position
  • Vision
  • Mental preparation
  • Car dynamics theory
  • Car maintenance check
Driving Exercises
  • Skidpad
  • Emergency Braking
  • Slalom/Swerve
  • Double Box

Did Not Attend a Clinic

Each student will get in-car instruction from an experienced GGR instructor. The emphasis of this clinic is car control, not racing. In that spirit, most car makes and models will be allowed to participate. No trucks, SUVs and vans allowed. Cayennes welcome. If you are uncertain, please email the event Chairmen beforehand, their decision will be final. The event is limited to 50 students.
 
Registration Procedure

Registration will be handled online via the MotorsportReg Online Driving Event Registration website. If you do not have an account, you will need to create one. This single account will allow you to register for PCA and other car club events.

If you are between the ages of 16-18, please click here to get the form, print it out, have parent and student sign it, and mail it to Howard Yao or bring it the morning of the event. Without this form, you will not be allowed to drive and there will be no refund.

 Cost: $99 a person, includes lunch

Event Chairmen: Claude Leglise and Howard Yao.

Carlsen ad
GGR Porboys Beginner Autocross School
Learn to Drive Your Porsche

John SeidelOkay, you bought THE PORSCHE. And it's a lot of fun to drive. But do you really know how to drive it--safely--the way it's designed to be driven?

It's very difficult to learn on your own how to drive hard and safely without endangering yourself, your insurance rating, and any deer or trees in the vicinity.

You could spend thousands of dollars at commercial driving schools to learn this. Or, for the princely sum of $99 (such a deal!) you could sign up for GGR's beginner autocross school. Ain't it great to be a member of the Porsche club?

What's more, it's SAFE! The worst you can do is hit a plastic cone.
Uncle John Wants YOU

Put on by GGR's own Howard Yao and John Seidell, this school takes place on Sunday, June 15 at Monster Park (a.k.a. Candlestick). Start time is 7:30 a.m. and it finishes at 5 p.m. For the incredible cost to attend, you get:
  • Instruction in at-the-limits car control and handling from the best instructors in the West
  • An introduction to how to participate in an autocross (which where many of us get together regularly to wear the rubber off our tires!)
  • Lunch and a t-shirt to elicit the wonder and admiration of your co-workers
To ensure lots driving time, attendance is limited to only 55 students. This fills up fast every year, so sign up now at Motor Sports Registration. You will need to create an account, then go to the June 15th date. Be sure you sign up for the Sunday, June 15th date since Saturday the 14th is the car control clinic for drivers aged 16 to 19.

Lastly, John Seidell promises to learn new jokes for this year, but we can't promise they'll be any better. (Just kidding, John!)

Proudly sponsored by Porboys German Automotive at 3640 East 9th Street in Oakland.
(510) 437-9400. Owners Joe and Annie Zeiph specialize in Porsche repairs, maintenance, and smog checks, work on all German cars, and come highly recommended.

President's Message
Bill Dally--by Bill Dally, GGR President

Seeing the Course Among the Cones

Sometimes people can't see the forest for the trees.  In autocross the equivalent is not seeing the course for the cones.  Sometimes you look out your windshield and all you see is a sea of orange pylons apparently randomly scattered across the pavement.  Its not clear where the course is, so you take a random path among the random pylons and get a random DNF (did not finish).

Finding the course among the cones involves two key concepts:  First, focus just on the important cones - there are rarely more than 20 on a given course (if there are more than 20, the course is too complicated).  Second, connect together related cones into a feature and see the feature, not the cones.

Consider the course segment shown in Figure 1.  The figure shows a course segment  defined by 40 pylons consisting of a 90-degree turn to the left followed by a 90 degree turn to the right.  A dotted line shows one possible line through this segment.  While this segment is defined by 40 pylons, only four pylons (shown in color) are important, and only two pylons (shown in red) are really important. 

Bill1 May

The two red pylons mark the apexes of the two turns and are critical in that they define the family of lines that can be taken through this course segment.  An optimal (fast) line will come as close as possible to both of these pylons.  If either of these two pylons is moved in any direction, the optimal line will change.  For example, if the lower left red pylon is moved up or left, the entry opens up and the segment gets faster.  If you move this pylon down or right the feature tightens and the line gets slower.

The two orange pylons also constrain the line, but only in one dimension.  Moving them up or down affects the line. Moving them left or right has no effect.  Also, moving these pylons out (e.g., moving the first orange pylon down) will make an adjacent pylon become important.  This is because each orange pylons is really part of a larger feature and is best thought of not as an individual pylon but rather as part of the feature, in this case an edge.

Figure 2 shows what our brain should see when we look at this course segment.   We see the two critical apex pylons (shown in red) and we see the outside exit and entry edges.  These two lines and two pylons are all we need to see to find the fast line through the segment.  The rest of the pylons - which have been omitted in Figure 2 are just distractions.  We don't need to see, or think about, the inside edges of the entry and exit paths.  We also don't need to consider any of the pylons along the vertical part of the segment except for the two apex pylons.  By blocking these gratuitous distracting pylons out of our mind, we are able to look at this segment and see four simple features - two edges and two pylons - rather than 40 pylons.

Bill2 May

At this point many readers will say, "when I look at the course, I still see 40 pylons."   That is to be expected.  Learning to see the abstract course when looking at a sea of pylons takes a little practice.  This practice starts with the course walk.  When you walk the course and draw your map, identify the important pylons, and group related pylons into features. After a little practice when you look out your windshield you see, not a sea of hundreds of randomly placed cones, but the next three or four important pylons and the next few features.  Everything clicks into place in your brain and you can find your way through the cones at speed with no difficulties.

Like many things in autocross the two principles of seeing a course among the cones can also help us in our daily lives.  Often we get inundated with issues - hundreds of e-mail messages arriving per day, phone calls constantly interrupting us, requests for trips to visit customers, suppliers, sponsors, etc.  All of these inputs start looking like a sea of pylons.  However, rather than be overwhelmed, we can identify the few important issues and focus on them - separating the important from the urgent (or just frequent).  We can also group together related issues and deal with them together - by solving the underlying problem.  Pretty soon we can look at our inbox full of messages and see a few critical issues, a few groups of related issues, and a lot of chaff that can be safely ignored.

In my role as club president, one of the critical issues (red pylons) that I see ahead is the difficulty of getting people to volunteer for key jobs.  We are an all-volunteer club and the autocross, time trial, concours, and social events that you enjoy are all the result of hard work on the part of our volunteers.  The problem we are having is that the same relatively small set of volunteers is doing all the work, and when they make a request for help it often falls on deaf ears.  For example, our autocross chairs were unable to find a volunteer to tow the timing trailer at the last autocross.  If people don't start stepping forward, we will soon have a problem running our events.  We need to renew and expand our core of volunteers.  I encourage you to step forward and get involved.  You will find that its very rewarding and gives you an opportunity to meet and work with a great bunch of people.

If you see any red pylons ahead that I should be aware of or have any other ideas on how to improve the club, please e-mail me.

Bill
Jerry WoodsSmart Racing
Letter from the Editor
Alameida big
--by John Celona, Nugget Editor

The letter for this month is "M" for "Mom." Thank your mom for bringing you into a world where it is perfectly legal for ordinary citizens to own and drive Porsches.

No, I'm not recommending that you take her for a ride. Flowers will do nicely, instead.

John
CommCovRennwerks
Competition Corner
Thompson--by Dan Thompson, Competition Director

Well the competition season is well under way now, we have had two AXs at the new site at Alameda, and we are starting to get the lay of the land. Andrew Blyholder's course design was a challenge for all cars, and it appears that the cars with big horse power liked it best for the most part. 

Please remember that we have no garbage service at Alameda, so just like back packing, what you bring in, you bring out. Please be mindful that Alameda is keeping an eye on us and they can withdraw our use permit at any time. We actually have to submit for a separate permit for each and every event. Please be cautious.

Our next event there is on May 17th, come on out and enjoy one of the most scenic AX sites in the western US.

We now have 2 DE/TT events in the books. Thunderhill was a wonderful event, with three full days of great weather, great cars, great folks and wonderful track time. Friday was very warm with little wind, each successive day it got a bit cooler and a bit breezier. Nothing that Thunderhill veterans are not used to. 

Andrew Forrest and his gang are doing a great job of putting on some wonderful track events. With our new National guide lines in place, there is very little you need to do other than bring your car and helmet and have a fantastic time driving your Porsche.

Our next DE/TT will be on May 24,25 at Buttonwillow Raceway. On Friday the 23, Central Coast Region will be hosting a DE day, so you can make this another 3 day driving event!

Get out there and drive your Porsche.

Dan
European Autotech
February Membership Report
--by Jeff Kost, Membershp DirectorJeff Kost




The prior membership report made it into the April Nugget, so Jeff will be back with a new report next month. --Ed.
BPS Repro
Board of Directors
Celona--by John Celona, GGR Secretary

GGR Board of Directors Meeting
April 2, 2008

The meeting was called to order at the residence of the President, Bill Dally. Present were: Bill Dally, Dan Thompson, Jeff Kost, Claude Leglise, Mark Powell, Bill Benz, Bill Kerr, John Celona, Matt Switzer, Larry Adams, Andrew Forrest, and Bob Murillo.


Call to Order
  • Call for agenda changes: add discussion of possible Bear Valley event
  • Call for calendar changes: none
Approval of February minutes: February minutes were previously approved via email.

Postmortem of events

DE/TT # 1 Infineon: people had a lot of fun and the weather was beautiful. Around 85 cars attended. 

2/22 Friday Night Social

3/15 Auto X  #1 Alameda: very successful. 92 paid participants, plus 9 comps. The site was quite good, but it is requiring three visits to city offices to obtain the permit for each event.

3/21 Friday Night Social
3/29 Ground School

Directors' Reports

President: nothing to report.

Vice-President

VP spoke to SCCA RE Mike Smith on 3/30 about the Auto X site search. SCCA has two possible sites in mind. Bob said GGR was still very interested in participating with the site, and they are interested in that also.

Upcoming event status report:

4/5 Boxster Brunch
4/12 Auto X #2 Alameda
4/18 - 4/20 Driver's Ed & Time Trial #2 Thunderhill
4/18/08 Friday Night Social
5/3 Ground School

Certificates are ordered for the following events:
None pending

Certificates are in place for the following events:
Eee
DE/TT # 2 Thunderhill 
4/12 Auto X  # 2 Alameda

Treasurer

GGR's tax returns were filed (state and federal, for a total of 4 returns). Thanks very much to Olen Creech for doing this.

A lot of prepayments for events are outstanding (Thunderhill and Buttonwillow for track weekends, and Alameda for autocrosses). Expenses have been paid for the first autocross at Alameda, but we are still waiting for the revenue. GGR's bank accounts are down as we continue to prepay for events, but we are maintaining the rebuilt savings balance.

Secretary: nothing to report.

Social

The Hiller Aviation Musuem in San Carlos has been reserved the GGR Annual Banquet on Sunday, January 11, 2009. A motion to proceed with the event and put a deposit down for the event was passed unanimously.

Mark also presented a number of ideas for other social events for the coming year. He will look into getting as many going as possible, and will need help from other folks to chair and put on the events.

Membership

Membership is up slightly. Jeff plans to start following up with people who haven't been renewing as to their reasons for not renewing.

Competition

PCA national minimum standards for time trials have now been approved and placed on the PCA web site. DE and Time trial minimum standards for matters such as seats, belts, etc., are now the same.  Instructors will still have the final say as to whether the condition of the car is suitable for being placed on the track, in addition to the mandatory technical inspections.

A motion was made to take official notice that PCA National has now adopted the same set of requirements for Drivers' Ed and for Time Trials. This motion was passed with 6 in favor, Mark Powell opposed.

A motion was made for GGR to adopt PCA's minimum standards for Drivers' Ed and Time Trials, effective immediately. The motion was passed with 6 in favor, Mark Powell opposed.

Webmaster: not present

Topics for discussion

Autocross timing system: Matt and Carl Switzer have completed developing specifications for a new autocross timing system, which includes wireless starting and finishing sensors, a bar code printer for cars, a bar code scanner, and automated timing software. The total cost for this system is $7,057.80. It also needs a Windows PC to run it. The past president, Claude Leglise donated a Sony laptop PC for evaluation.

The is system would use the current countertop and roof top displays, but everything else is wireless. The system would involve scanning a bar code on a car at the start, then scanning it again at the end. At the end of each run group, the times for the entire run group can be printed out and posted.

Jeff recommended adding another printer or two in case the printer fails. A backup label printer and result printer were added to the budget. It estimated that another $500-600 in incidental expenses will be required to fully implement the system.

A motion to approve the budget with an additional $250 for another printer was approved unanimously.

Goodie store - Bill Kerr. Bill presented an inventory of the goodie store. The issue is that the Goodie Store presently has a stock of items which aren't in demand (clothing in small and medium sizes, etc.) Given the time it takes and that a lot of items are ordered by people in other parts of the country, it was suggested that this is not an area the club should be expending time and energy.

A motion was made to (1) liquidate the existing Goodie Store inventory; and (2) to outsource production and sale of any items still desired to a firm which does this commercially. The motion was passed unanimously. 

Drivers' Ed Attendance Decline

Attendance for the first DE at Infineon was only two-thirds of projected attendance. It was thought that this was because it was early in the year at Infineon where there have been rain issues in previous years. Unfortunately, sign-ups for the second DE at Thunderhill are also looking to be only two-thirds of the projected attendance.

The suggestions were made to allow certified drivers to run non-Porsches, and to make known the rule change allowing cars approved for DE to run for time. This will be done for the next event. It was also suggested possibly doing another joint event with the Porsche Racing Club (PRC), which may be possible for a future event if insurance issues can be resolved. Andrew will look for further actions to address attendance.

Bear Valley Event

Bear Valley, Pacific Power, and Iron Horse winery have approached GGR about working on an event that may include a car show, an autocross, a hill climb, a rally, and off-road tours (four-wheeling on dirt fire roads). They want to know if the club would be interested in participating in and publicizing an event. The event would be in August. The consensus was that Jeff should pursue developing the idea. Issues are scheduling and types of events, and what could be covered under PCA insurance.

The meeting was adjourned at 9:20 p.m.

Club Sportiva2
2008 Drivers' Ed & Time Trial Schedule
TT banner
  Rich Bontempi's HIGH PERFORMANCE HOUSE
 










  Sat Mar 29, '08   Ground School Round Table Pizza, Concord

  Apr 18-20, '08   Driver's Ed & Time Trial #2 Thunderhill

  Sat May 3, '08   Ground School Round Table Pizza, Concord

  May 24-25, '08   Driver's Ed & Time Trial #3 Buttonwillow

  Sat Jul 26, '08   Ground School Round Table Pizza, Concord

  Aug 16-17, '08   Driver's Ed & Time Trial #4 Thunderhill

  Sat Aug 30, '08   Ground School Round Table Pizza, Concord

  Sep 20-21, '08   Driver's Ed & Time Trial #5 Thunderhill

High Performance House
The Power Chef
NE Bike
Ode to Onion Soup

--by John Celona, The Power Chef

Earlier this month I was staying at a very fancy "inn" in Arizona and, not really wanting to venture forth after a day of traveling, I decided to chance the main dining room.

It was a very fancy place, so naturally I was quite concerned. Usually, I look for buffets where, as I related last month, one can nosh quite substantially on healthy stuff and leave feeling satisfied and not the least bit hungry or guilty. No such option available here. What to do?

I decided to be brave and order the tasting menu. How bad could it be? I could always leave some on the plate if I had to. And I probably had time to go for a run in the morning and burn off the excess.
PC May1
First came the appetizer.

They were not kidding.

It was a tiny bit of chopped tuna ceviche style with some green onions and capers, served on a single baby endive leaf with two dollops of Meyer lemon cream on the side.

Delicious, actually, but I had to deliberately take two bites to eat rather than down it in one gulp. I passed the time between the two bites congratulating myself on identifying the Meyer lemon. I pondered the propsect of asking the kitchen if I could get a dozen more before deciding they wouldn't see the humor in my request (was I actually kidding?)

Then, inexplicably, came another appetizer. I decided I must have been wrong and the first plate was some sort of teaser just to get one's stomach grumbling. Probably there was a french word for it, but I missed it. Excusez-moi, s'il vous plait.
PC May2
This one was a little bit of grilled ahi tuna, served with a chopped fennel relish, and and a tiny pastry, on a bed of vaguely tomatoey-cream sauce. I guess Arizona must be big on fish since the state is so hot and dry and far away from any place these fish might live. And don't forget the orchid tucked next to the ahi. Was it edible?

Again, it was good for the four or five bites it took to consume it.

Then came the salad.

PC May3

That consisted of a handful greens and a few strips of deep fried sweet potatoes on a bed of sweet creamy sauce (dressing?) with some reduced raspberry syrup drizzled over the whole thing.

Leaf and fiber count: low (and it's a salad!). Sugar and fat content: high. I began to think I should have driven a few block to find some place with an enormous taco salad for $6.95, but, being in mid-meal, I was now committed. I was sure that if I tried to leave now, I'd be arrested.

PC May5Finally, it was time for the "main course."

Fish again, this time halibut. I must be on to something with this ocean-yearning.

Don't get me wrong: I love halibut. I grill it all the time after marinating it with Meyer lemon juice and grated rind (from my tree!), salt, pepper, and a little olive oil.

This one was good too, all 3-1/2 x 2 inches of it. Topped with another chopped tomato and "stuff" relish and sitting on a little pastry-bagged bed of mashed purple potatoes, which in turn rolled on 6 little spears of aspargus (so you could move it without hurting your back!)--and all on--you guessed it--a puddle of buttery creamy sauce.

Fine. I should have known better. But, after relating last month about what I usually do on the road and not having tried ordering a fancy meal for quite some time, I felt I should check and see if what I usually disliked about eating out had changed. Lamentably not. Nutritional balance was all wrong (too much fat and sugar and too little complex carbohydrates), and portion sizes were small to boot. Probably exacerbated because, as the economy starts to turn, the first thing to shrink is portion sizes in restaurants.

At that point, I was entitled to a dessert. However, trying to salvage some dietary dignity out of the meal, I had asked if I could get something else instead of the dessert. Soup was the suggestion. And the waiter suggested onion soup.

I debated mightily. I had been so disparaging of onion soup last month. I should perhaps give it another try. I agreed to the onion soup.
PC May5
I was not surprised. Here it is: a piece of cheese-laden grilled bread sitting on a surprise underneath. And the underneath (the soup) turned out to be very salty, slightly beefy broth, with translucent onions floating in it that betrayed not a hint of the caramelized browning that lends such an exquisite flavor to a good onion soup.

I stand on my prior advice: avoid the onion soup.

That was my fancy tasting meal. All for only $90 plus tip (that was food only; I passed on the wine pairings for another $50.)

But that got me thinking as I left the restaurant about how truly wonderful a great onion soup can be: bursting with grilled onion and beef flavor. I turn it into an entire meal by adding grilled cubes of lean beef to it, white beans, and a full-flavored green such as mustard or collard greens. It epitomizes everything I love about great food: full of flavor, loaded with yummy vegetables, filling and satisfying---but not loaded with calories and fat. Something you can eat until you don't feel like eating any more and not feel guilty about a single bite.

That's really my philosophy about food in a nutshell: making great tasting, super-healthy food you can eat as much of as you like. Only it's so hard to do in a restaurant. As I found out, once again.

So allow me to dedicate this as an ode to my Uber-Onion Soup. The recipe follows. Hope you love it as much as I do.

Bon appetit,
The Power Chef

Über-Onion Soup

PC May6

A classic french soup fortified with beef, greens and beans to make it a complete and healthy meal. This recipe is also great for giving a new life to leftover roast beef or steak.

The Gist

Onions are caramelized in butter, then simmered in beef broth with white beans. Fresh greens (collard greens in this version) are added at the end. The soup is then served with wheat bread toasted with cheese on top.

Ingredients

2-3 lbs. cubed beef (leftover roast or fresh)
2 quarts water
3 Tbs. beef stock base
1 stick butter
5 yellow onions, sliced
1 lbs. dry white beans (such as the Great Northern variety)
1 pkg. fresh thyme, minced
1/2 cup white wine or brandy
salt and pepper to taste
2 large bunches collard greens, chopped
8 slices whole wheat bread
1 cup mixed grated swiss and parmesan cheese

Method

Cut the leftover or fresh beef into small cubes. If you're using leftover roast beef or steak from one of the marinated, grilled recipes in this book, it can immediately go into the water to start simmering. If you're using fresh beef, brown it in the stock pot over high heat first, then add the water.

Add the stock base to the water and bring it to a simmer. Leave it simmering while you prepare the onions. (The stock can also be prepared ahead and simmered for several hours, but 30-45 minutes will get you most of the flavor.)

Place the butter in the bottom of a large stock pot, then add the sliced onions. Heat the pan over medium heat until the butter is melted, then cover the pan and raise the heat to high. Stir the onions every few minutes as they give up their juices. After about 15 minutes, uncover the pan, turn the heat down to medium, and stir the onions every few minutes until golden brown. Be sure to scrape the bottom of the pan as you stir so it doesn't burn on the bottom. If the onions start to stick, you can add just a little water to unstick them.

Rinse the dry white beans thoroughly in a colander.

When the onions are golden and caramelized, add the beef stock and cubes, thyme, dry white beans, and the white wine or brandy. Bring the mixture to a simmer and taste for salt and pepper. If you're using marinated, leftover beef, you may not need any more salt or pepper.

Simmer the soup until the beans are tender (about 1-1/2 hours).

Lightly toast the slices of wheat bread. A toaster oven can do them all at once. Place the toasted slices on aluminum foil or a baking sheet and sprinkle the mixed, grated cheeses over them. Return them to the oven or toaster oven for a final toasting when you're ready to serve the soup.
Just before serving, add the greens and shut off the heat. Give the bread a final toasting, then serve. The greens will still be bright green an crunchy. Float a slice of toast on top of each bowl, or-for folks who like their toast crisp-serve it on the side for dipping.

Variations

I also like this soup with cannelloni beans (white kidney beans) and kale instead of collard greens. Any sturdy, cooking green would also do well. Mustard greens would be an interesting choice if you like mustard flavor with your beef.

Kahlers
Porsche Roads
Leglise2
--by Claude Leglise, GGR past president

Carmel Valley Road and River Road

Carmel is a very popular northern California destination year-round. Whether for golfing, shopping, sightseeing or simply hanging out, the area is a magnet for weekend travelers. Few folks explore the back roads in the vicinity, however, as most prefer to congregate on Highway 1. In this installment of Porsche Roads, I want to tell you about a very picturesque and less traveled alternative.

From the town of Carmel, take Highway 1 going south and make a left on Carmel Valley Road. The first few miles consist of shopping malls, housing developments and golf courses, but don't worry, what comes next is worth the wait.

About three miles outside of town, the first interesting stop for all serious car fans is Baja Cantina in the Valley Hills shopping area on the right side, past the Quail Lodge. The Mexican menu has a nice Oaxaca flavor, but the real attraction is all the automotive memorabilia covering the inside and outside walls. This place is a favorite of all the racing drivers who come to nearby Laguna Seca. If you happen to be there on a Thursday evening, you may find several dozen classic cars and hot rods in the parking lot.

Roads May1

Past the cantina, on the left-hand side, is Laureles Grade Road, which goes back to Laguna Seca. It is an interesting road, but not our destination today. Stay on Carmel Valley Road and the real fun starts past Carmel Valley Village when you enter Klondike Canyon in the Santa Lucia Mountains. Traffic disappears as if by magic, the road narrows, oaks hang gracefully over the pavement; this is what California must have looked like a couple of centuries ago. As you wind your way through the mountains, you will soon arrive at the Hastings Natural History Reservation, where you may well see a bobcat, a mountain lion or a deer. The road gently climbs to 2000 feet, and soon the oaks give way to vast grazing pastures and open landscapes. Past the summit, you begin the descent towards the valley of the Salinas River. There are many Kodak opportunities along the way as you drive past ranches, donkeys, wineries, hay fields and more.

Carmel Valley Road turns into Arroyo Seco Road, and at the intersection of Elm Avenue, you may choose to turn right towards Greenfield and Highway 101, if time is running short. If you stay on Arroyo Seco instead, prepare for an entirely different California, as you are now on the fertile west bench of the Salinas River.

Roads May2

Follow Arroyo Seco for about 5 miles and turn left on Fort Romie Road. At the end of the 19th century, the Fort Romie Colony was a Salvation Army agricultural commune. I do not know if it ever had a proper heyday, but it is not now. The more interesting sightseeing stop is a mile after the turnoff at Mission Nuestra Señora de la Soledad, founded in 1791 and one of the rarely visited California Missions. Pull over for a quick visit; it is unlikely that you will see more than 10 other people on the grounds, and you will get a good sense of how lonesome the place is. The name Soledad was well chosen.

Roads May3

North of the Mission, Fort Romie Road becomes River Road and follows the contours of the Santa Lucia Mountains about 2 miles west of Highway 101. You may want to stop at the San Saba Vineyards or the Manzoni Estate Vineyard for a sampling of the local production, or pull over to admire the vast fields of cacti that seem to extend all the way to the foothills.

Roads May4

As Salinas nears, housing developments reappear in the windshield, and soon you reach Highway 68. There you can turn left and go back to Carmel, or turn right towards downtown Salinas and Highway 101 if it is time to drive home.

Claude

Scale: 1* to 5*        Twistiness    Pavement quality    Scenery

Carmel Valley Road     ****                   ***                       ****
River Road                    *                    ****                       ***

Roads May5
Vineyard Specialties2
Enter for the Carolina Trophy
September Means More Porsches In The Carolina Mountains!

--by Paul Misencik, Metrolina Area PCA, Huntersville, NC

For the past four years now, I've been organizing and running an event every September called "The Carolina Trophy," which is a five-day, European-style vintage motorcar road rally in the spirit of the Mille Miglia and Rallye des Alpes.  The event is based out of Lake Lure, North Carolina and covers 1000km over five days on some of the most sinewy and serpentine roads anywhere.  As a loyal Porsche owner and enthusiast, it warms my heart that the best-represented marque every year is Porsche, and 2008 appears to be no exception!

Carolina

Although registration is still in its early stages, we already have a four-cam 356 Carrera GS entered, a stunning 911SC RS rally replica (in Rothman's livery), two 1955 Speedsters, three 356 coupes, and two early 911's.  In addition, we have vintage Ferraris, Jaguars, Aston Martins, Austin-Healeys, and Alpine-Renaults coming from all over the United States, Canada, and even abroad!  By the time the field is set, I feel certain we'll have everything from thundering Corvettes to snarling MG's taking the starting line.

Although the Carolina Trophy is technically a "competitive" event, every stage takes place on open public roadways at legal speeds.  Each car is piloted by a driver and a navigator, and the rally is timed and scored using a combination of TSD stages and regularity legs, with ample transition stages mixed in to make ensure teams have plenty of time to relax and enjoy the roads and scenery.  Some of our entrants take the competitive side of the rally very seriously indeed, while others don't compete and merely enjoy the routes at whatever pace they choose.  Regardless, the event is set up to make sure the spirit of adventure, camaraderie, and gentlemanly competition is accessible to every entrant.

Virtually all-inclusive, the Carolina Trophy is set in gracious accommodations and includes meals, beverages and many cocktails, with social events from start to finish that make up a significant portion of the event's appeal.  By day, entrants are charging through the mountains and competing against the clock, but lunches and evenings are invariably chances for teams to connect with on another, relive the adventure of the day, and tell fish stories about cars and other topics with a group of passionate, like-minded enthusiasts.

If you love cars, I urge you to come out and experience the 2008 running of The Premier Financial Services Carolina Trophy, which takes place September 14-19, 2008.  All vehicles built in 1980 or earlier are eligible to compete, with a "special interest" class available to cars of particular interest built later than that date.  We also love to have spectators, we always need volunteers, and unique and affordable sponsorship opportunities exist for forward-thinking companies, so come on out and enjoy the action!

Complete details can be found at www.carolinatrophy.com, or call (704) 351 2087 and ask for Paul!  See you in September!
2008 Porsche Parade Registration
Hello and Greetings from Charlotte!

We, the Parade 2008 Team, would like to thank you for your continued interest in Porsche Parade 2008. As you have probably read in this months' PANORAMA we have a very exciting line-up of events in store for you here in the 'Queen City'.

At this time we would like to introduce the official Porsche Parade 2008 Website. It is now 'LIVE' and available for viewing at www.paradecharlotte.org.  Please feel free to explore the site and see what we have planned.  FYI - More information will be posted on the website as it becomes available.

*** Remember that Registration for the 2008 Porsche Parade opens at 9AM EST on Tuesday March 11th 2008 - Put it on your Calendar !!! ***

Thanks!

Harvey Yancey || Chair 
Porsche Parade 2008 - Charlotte
Carolinas Region
Porsche Club of America

http://www.paradecharlotte.org
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Happy May, and Happy Mother's Day to all the moms out there. Dads: be good to the moms. Your turn's coming soon!

As always, thanks for reading.
John Celona
Porsche Club of America-Golden Gate Region
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Porsche Club of America--Golden Gate Region | Nugget Headquarters | 505 Vista Ave | San Carlos | CA | 94070
Begin forwarded message:

From: John Celona <nugget-ed@sbcglobal.net>
Subject: From Porsche Club of America--Golden Gate Region
Date: June 2, 2008 8:32:29 PM PDT

Fathers Day2GGR Logo
Porsche Club of America
Golden Gate Region
Nugget pic
June 2008. Volume 48, Issue 6
In This Issue
President's Message
Letter from the Editor
Competition Corner
Board of Directors
2008 DE Schedule
The Power Chef
Porsche Roads
GGR Family Picnic
The Carolina Trophy
SVR / Zone 7 Concours
Zone 7 Gimmick Rally
PCA Raffle
Quick Links
Dear Porsche Enthusiast,

Welcome to The Nugget, the email newsletter of the Golden Gate Region, Porsche Club of America.
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If you have any trouble viewing this email, you can click here to go to the online versions of this newsletter. For comments or feedback, click here to email the editor.

Thanks for reading.
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Pawlina Paraskova CG
Executive Editor of The Nugget
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President's Message
Bill Dally--by Bill Dally, GGR President


Mechanical Therapy

Living in Silicon Valley can often be stressful. Pressures can build up as deadlines approach, when difficult decisions must be made, or when things beyond our control go in directions unfavorable for us. Different people deal with stress in different ways. Some people exercise, others drink, some yell at their colleagues and loved ones, others see a psychiatrist. I have found Porsches to be a wonderful way to relieve stress - less expensive than an analyst and easier on your liver than drinking.

Of course the best way to relieve stress with your Porsche is to drive it, especially at a competition event. Nothing relieves stress better than focusing entirely on driving your car at its limits. At the end of a track day or autocross you have a better perspective on things and you can approach life's challenges with your batteries recharged. Unfortunately there isn't a competition event every day, and while taking a spirited drive on some of the twisties in the Santa Cruz Mountains is almost as good, with premium gas over four dollars a gallon sometimes an alternative stress reliever is needed.

I have found that working on my Porsches is almost as much fun as driving them and is also a great way to deal with stress. I refer to this as mechanical therapy. While it doesn't get the adrenalin pumping the way competition driving does, tinkering with your Porsche has many rewards. First, focusing completely on the mechanical job at hand pushes your daily worries aside and gives you perspective. Second, seeing your job complete gives you immediate gratification - which is often missing in a world where projects can take years to complete. Third, you get to know your car better and you come to appreciate it more as you see the little details that have been gotten exactly right. You can't really appreciate the superb engineering of our cars unless you look inside. Finally, driving your car becomes even more fun as you take pride in having set it up yourself.

One of my favorite stress relieving activities is setting the valve timing on a 911 engine. Engine rebuilding in general is a great stress reliever as it is fairly clean (after the initial disassembly and cleaning), demands attention to detail, and involves precise tolerances. And, of course the gratification of firing up an engine you have just rebuilt and having it run well is hard to match. The valve train of the 911 engine works, quite literally, like clockwork. The two camshafts are driven via two timing chains from sprockets on the intermediate shaft. The chain drive has a 2:1 reduction so the camshafts go around once for every two crankshaft revolutions.

For the engine to operate properly - and for valves not to hit the top of pistons - the angle of each camshaft when the crankshaft is at top-dead-center (TDC) must be set precisely. Since what matters is valve position, the specification lists not an angle (which would be hard to measure precisely), but rather the amount of intake valve lift at TDC. For the mod-S cams in my 3.2L 914/6, the specification is for 3.0-3.2mm of of lift on the #1 intake valve at TDC and the same lift on the #4 intake valve after the crankshaft has been rotated 180 degrees.

 Bill photo June

As shown in the photo above, the measurement is made using a dial indicator and is performed after shims have been inserted to ensure that the timing chain is running in a plane, with just the #1 (and later the #4) intake and exhaust rocker arms in place, and with zero valve gap. The measurement is also made with a clamp on the chain tensioner (not shown) to take any slack out of the timing chain.

Unless you are extremely lucky and happen to have the correct valve lift on your first try, valve timing is adjusted by moving a dowel pin that connects the inner and outer timing sprockets. The outer sprocket has 32 holes and the inner sprocket has 31, so by picking the right pair of holes the angle can be adjusted in increments of 1/992 of a rotation. (A similar system is used to adjust rear ride height on a 911 by using a torsion bar with different numbers of splines on the two ends.) Remove the bolt and washer and then using the skinny end of a spark plug (yes, the threads are the same) remove the dowel. Carefully rotate the cam to get the correct lift (don't let it "get away" from you), and insert the dowel into the one open hole. Reinstall the washer and bolt (torque appropriately) and repeat the measurement. If its not within limits, moving the dowel one hole over should remedy the problem. When you get it right, repeat the procedure for the other camshaft using the #4 intake valve. When you have both right, reward yourself with a beer.

A few hours of checking, assembly, and installation later, when you fire up the engine for the first time, you will have a great feeling of satisfaction. This is much better therapy than psychiatrists or alcohol - although not quite as good as an autocross or a track day. (We won't talk about how you feel when you fire the engine up for the first time and it makes a loud bang and seizes up.)

An old saying goes: "it's a simple job that doesn't require the purchase of a new tool." The first time you do it, adjusting valve timing does not meet this definition of simplicity. The "Zee" bracket that holds the dial indicator and a special wrench to hold the cam sprocket while you torque the bolt are required for this job.

I have friends who think the best automotive tools are a checkbook and a pen, not a torque wrench. If you fall in this category but would like to enjoy the advantages of mechanical therapy, I encourage you to start slowly. Start by changing your oil or brake pads, not by setting the pinion gear preload and backlash on your transmission. If you have a 65-89 911, Wayne Dempsey's book, 101 Projects for Your Porsche 911, has a lot of great ideas along with readable directions.

Mechanical therapy is best enjoyed with friends. (Perhaps this is group therapy). If you need assistance tackling a difficulty project, or if you just want someone to chat with while you work, ask a knowledgeable friend to come over and give you a hand. Most club members are generous with their time and knowledge. Just be prepared to reciprocate when they call you up needing an extra set of hands - and realize that providing food and beverages for assistants is expected. Its particularly useful to have an audience on hand to see and hear your reaction when after completing assembly of an engine you discover that you have forgotten some small but critical internal component - like the oil pump seals.

Like a well-assembled engine, your club is running well. We are now well into both the autocross and time trial series and we have a number of social events on the calendar - including a club picnic at Vasona Park. A critical ingredient to our upcoming events is you. Come out to an autocross or a social event. Become involved in the club and volunteer to help run our events. If you have an idea for a new type of event, let us know - but be prepared to help in organizing it.

As always, I'd very much like to hear your suggestions for how to make the club even better. Please feel free to e-mail me.

Bill
Jerry WoodsSmart Racing
Letter from the Editor
Alameida big
--by John Celona, Nugget Editor

For this month's Nugget, we have a new title photo and new colors on the bars. The occasion was the convergence of:
        1. Flying back into San Francisco on one of my many frequent trips
        2. In a window seat (I usually choose an aisle seat)
        3. It wasn't already late at night
        4. Looking out the window to a spectacular view of the Golden Gate Bridge
        5. Noting that the window was less scratched than the usual United window
        6. Actually having time to whip out the iPhone and snap a photo before the flight attendants arrested me for using a portable electronic device during the descent.
As you might guess, these events are unlikely to occur simultaneously again during my lifetime. Hence the photo. Hope you like it. Then, of course, the color bars had to change to match.

We here at The Nugget tend to aim small but meaningful incremental improvements.

Cheerios,
John
CommCovRennwerks
Competition Corner
Thompson--by Dan Thompson, Competition Director

Ok, our 2008 competitive season is well under way now. We have 3 time trials in the books with times recored for all three, including Infineon! Three autocrosses done with one on it's way in June on the 21st at Alameda and we also have the Beginner AX school scheduled for June 15, at Candlestick.. It is obvious from our schedule that GGR folks love to drive their Porsches.........FAST!

So now we come to the time of year when the Competition Director (me), asks the general membership about our competition rules. What do you like, what don't you like and if you don't like something. How would you like to see it changed. In other words, if their is something in our current rules you find annoying, then make a rules change proposal. This is the only way our rules evolve and get better. When you, the members, take the time to really look at the current rules and make proposals to change them for the better of the entire club. Please start thinking about this and start forwarding your thoughts to me directly. Thanks in advance for your thoughtful suggestions.

This will be my final year as Competition Director, so any of you that would like to give back to the club, now is the time to step up and talk to me about being my successor. We can do this in a confidential manner, so you don't make a commitment that you are unsure of the requirements. Please contact me directly if you have any desire to serve on the GGR board of directors in this capacity.

Our next time trial is in August at our "home" track, Thunderhill. Check the schedule for more information on this.

See you at the track.

Dan
European Autotech
BPS Repro
Board of Directors
Celona--by John Celona, GGR Secretary

GGR Board of Directors Meeting

May 21, 2008

The meeting was held at Bill Dally's house, and it was called to order at 7 p.m. Present were: Matt Switzer, Larry Adams, Claude Leglise, Bob Murillo, Bill Dally, Dan Thompson, Andrew Forrest, John Celona, Paul Larson, Mark Powell, and Bill Benz.


Call to Order

Call for agenda changes:
none

Call for calendar changes: the car control school for teen drivers has been cancelled due to scarcity of signups. Enrollees will be placed in the beginners' autocross school.

Approval of April minutes
These minutes were previously approved via email.

Postmortem of events
5/3 Ground School
5/17 Autocross

Directors' Reports

President: nothing to report.

Vice-President

Upcoming event status report:
  • 5/24-25 DE/TT 3 Buttonwillow
  • 6/7 Boxster Brunch
  • 6/14 Car control clinic Monster: cancelled
  • 6/15 Beginners auto X school Monster
Certificates are ordered for the following events:
  • Auto X dates 7/19 and 9/13 at  Alameda have been requested to be added to the existing certificate.
  • 6/14 Car control clinic Monster
  • 6/15 Beginners auto X school Monster
Certificates are in place for the following events:
  • DE/TT # 3 Buttonwillow
Treasurer
  • The new timing system for autocross has been paid for. Buttonwillow has been prepaid, and we have a credit at Buttonwillow.
  • Motorsports Reg experienced some significant system problems with a software upgrade, but has remedied it and caught up with reporting. GGR is receiving a credit in return for the trouble.
Secretary

After efforts to enlist a GGR Historian have proven fruitless, the effort is being dropped. The plan is still to clean out the GGR storage area over the summer and vacate it to save the rental cost.

Social

We are confirmed for the annual banquet in January at the Hiller Museum in San Carlos.

Sunday, July 27 at Vasona Park in Los Gatos is reserved for the first annual GGR family picnic. There will also be a wash-n-shine concours. This event will be registered as a "special event," which means Vasona will close the parking lot to non-participants. Cost will be around $20 per person and $10 for children, and includes a meal catered by Armadillo Willie's. The club will subsidize the cost of the event, which is greater than that.

Mark is still working on a tech session at Jerry Woods.

Membership

The April membership report was presented. Total members are at 2564. Over the past two years, membership has remained stable at about this level.

Pacific Power Motorsports event at Bear Valley is a go, weekend of September 6/7.  It will be an AX and a car show of some sort.  Will also have fun drives both on road and off road (but not hosted events).  Awards at lunch Sunday.

Competition--Autocross
  • Due to increasing costs for renting autocross venues, the standard fee was increased to $40 per event, with a $10 discount for PCA members.
  • Further efforts will be made to enforce the existing policy that any Porsche owner may participate in autocross, but non-Porsches may only be run by GGR members with the permission of the event chair.
  • Matt has picked up the new timing system. Some additional parts were required, and some components (such as the bar code reader) had to be exchanged for kits which included a charger, base station reader, etc.
Competition-Drivers' Ed
  • Contrary to prior expectations, revenues actually exceeded expenses for TT#2. Sighs of relief were shared.
  • Nevertheless, Buttonwillow was priced for lower attendance expectations, and is close to the break-even point (not there yet).
Webmaster

Paul has entered GGR in the PCA web site contest.

The website is averaging 1050 people per day, with an average of 3.5 page views per person (3700 page views per day).

Nugget Editor

Allowing anyone to subscribe to the email edition of The Nugget is starting to draw new members into the club. The communication from the email service to new subscribers has to be sorted out because some people have been confused as to whether subscribing alone enrolls them in GGR.

Topics for discussion

Approve budget for AX School (Claude). Motion to approve the budget was passed unanimously.
    
Carlsen has offered a "subisidy" for AX events at San Mateo Fairgrounds. Carl will make one more effort to see if Bay Meadows will extend the hours to those needed to run an autocross (no entry until 9 a.m. doesn't work).

Recommended charity for the concour & rally proceeds. We'll split the donation 50/50 between a charity selected by Carlsen Porsche and one selected by GGR.

Adjournment

The meeting was adjourned at 9 p.m. The next meeting will be held July 23 at the residence of the president, Bill Dally. People wishing to add items to the agenda should email him.
Club Sportiva2
2008 Drivers' Ed & Time Trial Schedule
TT banner
  Rich Bontempi's HIGH PERFORMANCE HOUSE
 










  Sat Mar 29, '08   Ground School Round Table Pizza, Concord

  Apr 18-20, '08   Driver's Ed & Time Trial #2 Thunderhill

  Sat May 3, '08   Ground School Round Table Pizza, Concord

  May 24-25, '08   Driver's Ed & Time Trial #3 Buttonwillow

  Sat Jul 26, '08   Ground School Round Table Pizza, Concord

  Aug 16-17, '08   Driver's Ed & Time Trial #4 Thunderhill

  Sat Aug 30, '08   Ground School Round Table Pizza, Concord

  Sep 20-21, '08   Driver's Ed & Time Trial #5 Thunderhill

High Performance House
The Power Chef
NE Bike
Taking the "Work" Out of "Workout"

--by John Celona, The Power Chef


We've all heard it: "you need to work out more." Could be from family members, a spouse, or even a close friend. If you hear it from a doctor, chances are the doctor is overweight (and needs to work out more!)

Getting the right balance between intake and output is not easy, but being out of balance usually sends the scale heading north. I, for one, don't like squeezing into the pants that used to fit so well, and don't like the thought of going out to buy bigger ones. That's like an admission of defeat. And it's not especially healthy, for a list of reasons that seems to be growing longer by the day.

So "Bite it and burn it" is my motto. If I work out less, I eat less. But, generally, I love to eat. So one way of keeping the poundage steady is to eat great tasting, but more healthy (lower fat!) food, as we've seen in past columns. It's a lot easier to add two less pats of butter than to spend an additional 20 minutes on the treadmill.

Another way is to add enough exercise to burn off the calories you're taking in. This gets us to the dreaded "workout."

Personally, I'm against "working out." I get more than enough work at work. Add a little yard work, housework, working on my taxes, and working on the "honey do" list and there seems to me more than enough work to go around. I see little reason to add to the list.

So my suggestion is to do something you find enjoyable and gets you moving and sweaty, and is maybe even relaxing. The last is the main motivator for me. I go for a run or a swim not to work more, but to get away from work and the phone and the email and relax for a bit. Nothing leaves me feel more tight, sore, and cranky than a day without a movement break away from all the work.

Different types of movement do this for different people. My spouse only dances. Sound silly? You wouldn't think so after attending a real 90-minute dance class.

For other people, it's doing something social, like a group exercise class in one of the innumerable varieties (aerobics, boot camp, body pump, water aerobics, etc.) or even a masters' swim workout. (Some might argue that, with all the time spend with your head in the water and little time for conversation, masters' swimming is distinctly antisocial, but that's another matter!)

The variety is nearly endless. There must be some kind of movement you would find enjoyable.

Not that it will be easy at first. If you're not used to it, you'll be tired and sore, and it will be difficult to find regular time in your busy schedule. A few lucky people take to a new activity like a duck to water, but, for most of us, getting over the hump is non-trivial. It took me years of failed attempts before I got regular with a movement activity. Finally, I did get to where that was often part of the day I most looked forward to.

I do believe everyone can get there. We were all born with a lot more body than is needed to work a fork and the remote control. Getting more enjoyment out of it than our mostly sedentary, mechanically assisted lifestyles requires is within everyone's grasps.

Allow me to offer a few more thoughts on movement activities. As you might guess, not all are created equally. Some are better at building cardiovascular fitness, others at building strength and bone density (very important for women!), and others flexibility or coordination. Seems to me that a good movement "stew" would have a little of each, just like a conventional stew will have some meat, some vegatables, some seasoning, and perhaps a good dose of red wine--or, perhaps more to the point--like food pyramid the FDA puts out to describe a healthy diet.

Not wanting to recreate the wheel, I looked around for an analogous fitness pyramid. Turns out there are lots--but they all are aimed at progressing to competition, and left some stuff out. Nothing wrong with racing, of course, but I don't see why one needs to race to stay in shape. (Disclaimer: I did do a lot of racing, but presently don't. My excuse is that I already have enough t-shirts!)

So I made up my own pyramid, which included the various things emphasized by different types of movement: cardiovascular fitness, strength, flexibility, and coordination (Did I leave something out? Please email me if you think so!). Here it is.

pyramid
My Fitness Pyramid

You might object that one can do quite will with just one part of the pyramid, and I do have friends who do only cardivascular activity, such as bicycling. Obviously, with only one leg, the pyramid would fall over! And I'll let you in on a little secret, the Pilates instructor at my health club (who gets a good measure of stretching and strengthening in class) sneaks out between classes to run and swim! A little of everything is good for variety, if nothing else.

Yes, there is a top of the pyramid: sharp mind. This is there because of a brilliant theory I have which will be a shoo-in for a Nobel prize in medicine as soon as I get more experimental data: Your Brain Is Connected To Your Body. Novel, huh?

I'll spare you the details of the studies on senior citiizens to improve their mental acuity and coordination. I already feel quite "senior" enough to be in need of mental challenges and conditioning.

Plus it's good for the fun.

Bon appetit,
The Power Chef
Kahlers
Porsche Roads
TT banner
--by Claude Leglise, GGR Past President


Patterson to San Jose via Mount Hamilton


Patterson, population 11,606, claims to be the "Apricot Capital of the World". Driving Highway 5, I had seen the exit sign for the town a dozen miles south of 580, but never found the time to stop. It turns out that Patterson is named after John D. Patterson, who purchased 13,340 acres in the area for the sum of $5,400 in 1866. Downtown Patterson features a few historical buildings of the period, and hosts the annual Apricot Fiesta the first weekend of June. Hurry up; it may not be too late to catch it. Of more obvious interest to Porsche drivers is State Route 130, which connects Patterson to San Jose over the Diablo Range.

R1 june

As you exit Interstate 5, go west and immediately turn right onto Del Puerto Canyon Road. Del Puerto is the original name of the Mexican land grant, and as soon as Highway 5 disappears in the rear view mirror, you are projected 150 years back. The ranch lands do not seem to have changed much since the days of Governor Micheltorena, but for the ribbon of asphalt. Three miles after the turnoff, the road enters the canyon of Del Puerto Creek, and the fun begins. The road is narrow and in reasonable shape. Watch out for cattle guards, some are in the apex of a turn, and most are not level with the road surface. The oaks are green and healthy thanks to recent winter rains, but black trunks on the hills still show the signs of fires past. At mile 16, you reach Frank Raines Park, a pretty good place for a picnic. Further west, the canyon narrows sharply, the curves tighten and second gear is often required. As the road climbs, the pavement is not in very good shape, but the quality improves once you reach the Santa Clara County line.

At mile 25, you arrive at The Junction (www.thejunctionbarandgrill.com), the only source of food and drink on this trip. The house specialties are grease burgers, Frito Lays and Coke. The bathrooms are functional. Long before the joint became the favorite stop of sports car drivers and motorcycle riders alike, De Anza's expedition came through in 1776 and called the area El Cañada de San Vincente.

r2 june

At The Junction, you could turn right and go back to Livermore, 31 miles away, but it's more fun to turn left onto San Antonio Valley Road towards San Jose. The road is nice and wide, and it is possible to go well over 35 miles an hour. But be alert, this is open range country; which means that the cattle are not fenced in. If you hit a cow, you have to pay for the repairs to your Porsche, and for the cow. Them beasts can be pricey! Watch out, too, for the occasional pig.

Soon, the first switchback around Sugarloaf Mountain offers a prelude to what is to come, and after crossing a small creek, you'll start to climb up the east side of Mount Hamilton at mile 38. The orange reflectors on the double yellow sink into the road, because this is where the snow plowing starts in the winter. What follows is 5 miles of twists, turns, and first gear switches that take you to the ridge, along Copernicus Peak, and ultimately to the Lick Observatory at the top of Mount Ham, 2000 feet above the creek. The view from the observatory parking lot is definitely worth a stop and a Kodak moment. On a clear day, you can see from the Monterey Peninsula to Mount Tamalpais, north of San Francisco. The observatory is open every day from 12:30 to 5:00, 10:00 to 5:00 on Saturdays and Sundays. You can visit the 26-inch telescope, see a live seismograph recording the movements of the earth's crust and view various exhibits.

r3 june

After a short rest, keep going west toward San Jose on Mount Hamilton Road. More tight and twisty stuff, all downhill. The road is quite narrow, and unfortunately the pavement is in fairly bad shape, so take it easy. It can get crowded on the weekends. Enjoy the view if you can, and practice heel and toeing on the downshifts. The bridge at the bottom of the slope signals the end of Mount Hamilton and your arrival at the Joseph D. Grant County Park, the largest park in Santa Clara County, located due east of San Jose. If you remembered to bring a horse along, the park has 52 miles of equestrian trails for you.

r4 june

At mile 58, the first houses appear above San Jose, and you get a spectacular view of the Santa Clara Valley. Four miles later, turn left on Alum Rock Avenue, and you are back in civilization, if we can call it that. Highway 680 is just a few traffic lights ahead.

r5 june

Scale: 1∆ to 5∆

                                          Twistiness      Pavement Quality       Scenery    
Del Puerto Canyon Road          ∆∆∆∆∆                ∆∆∆                      ∆∆∆∆
San Antonio Valley Road         ∆∆∆∆∆                ∆∆∆∆                     ∆∆∆
Mount Hamilton Road              ∆∆∆∆∆                  ∆∆                      ∆∆∆∆∆

Did I forget to mention to gas up before you leave? There is not a single gas station between Patterson and San Jose, and practically no cell phone coverage. AAA might take a while to arrive.

Claude

r6 june
Vineyard Specialties2
GGR Family Picnic & Concours
Announcing

 GGR's First Annual Family Picnic / Peoples Choice Wash and Shine Concours

Join your fellow Porsche enthusiasts Sunday July 27th at Vasona County Park for this year's premier social event!!  

                   Vasona park

The event will feature a delicious BBQ lunch catered by Armadillo Willy's, a People's Choice Wash and Shine Concours, Games, and more!!  Best of all the price is only $20 per adult with children free!! 

Armadillo Willy's Lunch will include Real Texas BBQ Ribs, Smoked BBQ Chicken, Smoked Texas Beef Brisket, BBQ Beans, Potato Salad, Green Salad, Soft Drinks and Desert!!

Register early so you don't miss this important event!!  

When:   Sunday,  July 27th, 2008
            10:00 AM to 4:00 PM

Where:  Vasona County Park, Circle Group Area
             333 Blossom Hill Road
             Los Gatos, CA 95032

Price:    Adults $20.00
             Children Free!!

Note: There is also a Vasona Park Fee of $6.00 per vehicle payable at the gate.

To attend, mail your check payable to PCA-GGR to:

             Mark Powell, PCA-GGR Social Director
             P.O. Box 23038
             San Jose, CA 95153-3038

Please include:

Your name:______________________________________________

e-mail address __________________________________________

Year and Model Car _____________________________________

Number of Adults________________________________________

Number of Children______________________________________

We need a final headcount one week in advance, so registration must be postmarked no later than July 17th.  We also need volunteers to help organize and run the event.  If you would like to help or if you would like more information on the event, please email Mark Powell.

vasona map
Enter for the Carolina Trophy
September Means More Porsches In The Carolina Mountains!

--by Paul Misencik, Metrolina Area PCA, Huntersville, NC

For the past four years now, I've been organizing and running an event every September called "The Carolina Trophy," which is a five-day, European-style vintage motorcar road rally in the spirit of the Mille Miglia and Rallye des Alpes.  The event is based out of Lake Lure, North Carolina and covers 1000km over five days on some of the most sinewy and serpentine roads anywhere.  As a loyal Porsche owner and enthusiast, it warms my heart that the best-represented marque every year is Porsche, and 2008 appears to be no exception!

Carolina

Although registration is still in its early stages, we already have a four-cam 356 Carrera GS entered, a stunning 911SC RS rally replica (in Rothman's livery), two 1955 Speedsters, three 356 coupes, and two early 911's.  In addition, we have vintage Ferraris, Jaguars, Aston Martins, Austin-Healeys, and Alpine-Renaults coming from all over the United States, Canada, and even abroad!  By the time the field is set, I feel certain we'll have everything from thundering Corvettes to snarling MG's taking the starting line.

Although the Carolina Trophy is technically a "competitive" event, every stage takes place on open public roadways at legal speeds.  Each car is piloted by a driver and a navigator, and the rally is timed and scored using a combination of TSD stages and regularity legs, with ample transition stages mixed in to make ensure teams have plenty of time to relax and enjoy the roads and scenery.  Some of our entrants take the competitive side of the rally very seriously indeed, while others don't compete and merely enjoy the routes at whatever pace they choose.  Regardless, the event is set up to make sure the spirit of adventure, camaraderie, and gentlemanly competition is accessible to every entrant.

Virtually all-inclusive, the Carolina Trophy is set in gracious accommodations and includes meals, beverages and many cocktails, with social events from start to finish that make up a significant portion of the event's appeal.  By day, entrants are charging through the mountains and competing against the clock, but lunches and evenings are invariably chances for teams to connect with on another, relive the adventure of the day, and tell fish stories about cars and other topics with a group of passionate, like-minded enthusiasts.

If you love cars, I urge you to come out and experience the 2008 running of The Premier Financial Services Carolina Trophy, which takes place September 14-19, 2008.  All vehicles built in 1980 or earlier are eligible to compete, with a "special interest" class available to cars of particular interest built later than that date.  We also love to have spectators, we always need volunteers, and unique and affordable sponsorship opportunities exist for forward-thinking companies, so come on out and enjoy the action!

Complete details can be found at www.carolinatrophy.com, or call (704) 351 2087 and ask for Paul!  See you in September!
suspension performance
SVR/Zone 7 Concours
Niello
Zone 7 Gimmick Rally
Zone 7 rally
PCA Raffle
pca raffle2
Yes, this June issue is a few days late. I've been more busy than I like to think about. I'll dock my pay accordingly. :)

As always, thanks for reading.
John Celona
Porsche Club of America-Golden Gate Region
Safe Unsubscribe
Porsche Club of America--Golden Gate Region | Nugget Headquarters | 505 Vista Ave | San Carlos | CA | 94070
Begin forwarded message:

From: John Celona <nugget-ed@sbcglobal.net>
Subject: From Porsche Club of America--Golden Gate Region
Date: June 30, 2008 8:40:57 PM PDT

July 4GGR Logo
Porsche Club of America
Golden Gate Region
Nugget pic
July 2008. Volume 48, Issue 7
In This Issue
President's Message
Letter from the Editor
Competition Corner
Board of Directors
Membership Report
2008 DE Schedule
The Power Chef
Porsche Roads
GGR Family Picnic
The Carolina Trophy
Zone 7 Gimmick Rally
Concours in Paradise
Zone 7 AX #4 & #5
PCA Raffle
Quick Links
Dear Porsche Enthusiast,

Welcome to The Nugget, the email newsletter of the Golden Gate Region, Porsche Club of America.
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If you have any trouble viewing this email, you can click here to go to the online versions of this newsletter. For comments or feedback, click here to email the editor.

Thanks for reading.
Click the button to subscribe (The Nugget is free!), and click here to join the Porsche Club of America.
Join Our Mailing List!
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Pawlina









Pawlina Paraskova CG
Executive Editor of The Nugget
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President's Message
Bill Dally--by Bill Dally, GGR President

What do you want from your club?

As a club, PCA/GGR strives to serve its members. However, it's hard for us to do that unless we know what you want from your club and unless you get involved.

It is clear that different people want different things from the club. Some want the excitement of competition with autocross or time-trial. Other members want opportunities to socialize with others who share their interest in Porsches, perhaps through tours, Friday-night socials, club picnics, or tech sessions. Yet others are interested in concurs or rallys.

There tends to be at least a little positive feedback in how the club operates. If we meet the needs of one segment of members, they tend to become more engaged with the club leading to more events of a particular type. For example, after an autocross, I can see that we are meeting the needs of the participants when I see the smiles on their faces or hear the excitement in their voices while they review the day with some bench racing. These people then become regular participants and eventually volunteer to help put on the events, leading to a strong competition program.

What about the members that don't come to an autocross or a time trial? or the Porsche owners who are not members? Are we serving these people? or has our focus on one aspect of the club caused us to be less effective at other aspects?

The GGR board would like to serve all members and to create a club that is attractive enough to convince Porsche owners who are not yet members to join. However, two things are required to make this happen: volunteers and participation. In recent years almost every proposal for an event that has been put before the GGR board has been approved. However, there is no tour this year because no one has stepped forward to propose and organize one.

If our region appears to be competition-heavy compared to others it is because we have a strong corps of volunteers who have been willing to step up and organize these events. We can have just as strong a series of other events if people are willing to come forward and put them on - and if people attend.

At this point some of you are probably thinking, "gee, I'd really like to see a Porsche trivia contest [substitute your favorite event here], but there is no way I have time to step forward and organize it." There are two bugs with this way of thinking. First, if everyone thought this way we wouldn't have a club. To make things work, people have to make the time to step forward and many do. We need even more people to volunteer - not just the same ones over and over again. The second bug with this way of thinking is that it ignores how much fun it is to put on an event. You get to work with a lot of really super people and then enjoy the praise when participants tell you how much they enjoyed your event. So what are you waiting for, step forward and create a new event.

Participation is key to the success of an event. After a great deal of hard work on the part of several volunteers, we recently cancelled our beginning driver school because only a handful of people had signed up (including my 18-year-old daughter). This school was a great idea - give newly licensed drivers some car control skills so they can get themselves out of difficult driving situations - yet it drew only a few participants.

Sometimes when an event is poorly attended, the cause is clear - it was cold and pouring rain, and so only a few crazy people (like me) showed up for the autocross. For a new event, however, the cause is less clear. Was there adequate publicity? Was the target group large enough to sustain the event? Was it scheduled at an inconvenient time? For new events (and especially new types of events) we need to be willing to (budget allowing) ride through a few lean events as we make adjustments to find a winning formula. People attend events that they are familiar with and new events often take time to build a following.

The club is putting on its first ever family picnic on July 27th. This is certain to be a fun event with barbecue, games, and a low-key concours. I am cautiously optimistic that this will be the first in a long series of club picnics - with attendance increasing each year.

As odd as it sounds, there are people who own a Porsche who are not PCA members. Why is this? Clearly these people don't realize that much of the fun of owning a Porsche is interacting with others of similar interests at club events. One possibility is that they don't know about the club - or perhaps they have the wrong idea about the club. (Perhaps someone told them that PCA is about street racing and side shows.) All of us can work to address this issue by being club ambassadors. If we see someone driving a Porsche - perhaps at work or at the mall - we can introduce ourselves, ask them if they are a member, and tell them what a great thing the club is.

Another possibility is that these people do know about the club and have an accurate idea of what we do, but they are looking for something else. For these people, we should find out what they are looking for. It may be something the club should be looking in to - if we can find volunteers and participants. While we all tend to find comfort in the club putting on familiar events, the world is changing and the club needs to evolve to meet a changing environment and a changing membership. Putting on new types of events and modifying our existing events is required to adapt to the changing environment.

So, what do you want from your club? We have received a number of e-mails with suggestions ranging from a once a year printed Nugget, to tech sessions, to numerous social events. Keep the ideas coming, but also realize that you need to volunteer to follow through to turn your idea into an event.

Porsches are a great deal of fun, and sharing the experience with other enthusiasts is even more fun. That is what the club is about. But its your club - to make it work we need both your ideas and your involvement.

If you are willing to help turn your ideas into events, please let us know by sending us e-mail. You can email me or email the board.

Bill
Jerry WoodsSmart Racing
Letter from the Editor
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--by John Celona, Nugget Editor

Membership Confusion Alleviated (Perhaps!)

If you're reading this, you've either subscribed to The Nugget or purchased a pirated copy on a recent trip to China. Subscribing to The Nugget is easy: just click the "Join our mailing list" button right at the top. And, thanks to The Miracle of the Internet, it's free! If every Porsche owner on the Earth and near planets decided to subscribe we might have a problem, but we're not near that (yet!).

However, there's apparently been some confusion in that people who subscribe to The Nugget also think they've joined the Porsche Club of America. In truth, the confirming message that went out to new subscribers was confusing. After a brief adventure with the technical support people with our mail service, that message has been corrected.

Allow me to make this clear: there is a separate step to join the Porsche Club of America. Click here to join. Make sure you indicate "Golden Gate Region" as your preferred region. Otherwise, you'll be assigned to a region based on your mailing address.

The benefits to being a member are huge. You get to participate in GGR events. You get a $10 discount at autocrosses. And you receive the award-winning PCA magazine Panorama in snail mail each month. Plus it comes in a discrete white envelope(!).

Check the stack of magazines in your bathroom. If there isn't a Panorama there, you probably haven't joined. And the cost is a grand total of $42/year--less than the cost of filling up your tank these days.

Join now and join the fun.

Cheerios,
John
CommCovRennwerks
Competition Corner
Thompson
--by Dan Thompson, Competition Director

It is now time for all of our competitive folks to peruse the current rules and submit rules proposals to me so that the DEC (Driver's Event Committee) have a chance to review your suggestions and then act on them appropriately.  Please make sure that your proposals not only make a suggestion for a change, but make sure that you indicate what particular portion of our rules it would effect and also give your reasoning for the proposed change. Later in the year, probably October, there will be an open meeting to discuss all of the proposals in a direct face to face format.
If you make a proposal, please plan on attending the meeting to give your proposal it's due.

If you have not made it out to one of our DE/TTs or AXs, you are really missing out on some great opportunities to drive your Porsche in a safe controlled environment, to is fullest potential, OK, maybe to what you think is it's full potential.

But the point is that there is no other club in northern California that gives you more opportunities to drive your car the way it was designed to be driven.  So what is keeping you  from joining in on the fun?

Also of note, this is my last year as Competition Director and GGR will be in need of a dedicated person that is interested in the competitive events and aspects of our club.  Please, if you enjoy our competitive events and have been looking for a way to step up and "give back" to the club, now is the time.  You can email me at any time to get more detailed information about the posititon.

See you at the track.

Dan
European Autotech
BPS Repro
Board of Directors
Celona--by John Celona, GGR Secretary

GGR Board of Directors Meeting


After a whole lot of calendar contortions, the May and June board meetings were combined on May 21 (which was reported in the June Nugget), and the next meeting will be held July 23 at the residence of the president, Bill Dally.

People wishing to add items to the agenda should email him.
Club Sportiva2
Membership Report
Jeff Kost
--by Jeff Kost, Membership Director

Total Members:  2521
Primary: 1471
Affiliate: 1049
Life: 1

New Members:  23
Transfers In:  3
Transfers Out: 8

New Members

Daniel Barrett

Sunnyvale

2007 Boxster

Christopher & Sarah Beauchamp

Los Gatos

2008 911 Turbo

Don Cabaluna

San Lorenzo

 

Patty Chan

San Francisco

 

Al Chow

Sunnyvale

1979 911 SC

Claudia Davis

Mountain View

1998 Boxster

Leonardo Denaro

Santa Clara

2001 911 996

Payton Dobbs

San Francisco

2001 911

Jennifer Emmer

Saratoga

1995 911

Sean Farrell

Livermore

 

Damian Fernandez

Saratoga

 

Erin Fogarty

Mountain View

 

Monica Garza

Sunnyvale

2001 Boxster

Gretchen Gibson

Oakland

 

Matthew Hough

San Francisco

1988 911

Peter Jan

Santa Clara

1973 914

Tero Koivunen

Mountain View

2002 911 Turbo

Patrick Krause

San Mateo

1986 951

John Lawrence

Escalon

 

Tony Le

Sunnyvale

2008 Carrera

Charlie Lehuray-Jones

San Francisco

1987 911

Lisa Mepham

San Jose

2007 Boxster

Gilles Merkel

Danville

1997 911

Martin Morris

Redwood City

2008 Cayman S

Daniel Moseley

Scotts Valley

2008 Carrera S

Cliff Pepper

San Francisco

2002 Turbo

Guy & Linda Plummer

Morgan Hill

2007 Boxster

Gregory & Kristin Quinlan

Los Altos

2005 911

Wei-Lii Tan

Menlo Park

 

Gwen Trappe

Forestville

 

Stephen Zadig

Palo Alto

2008 997

 
Anniversaries

 45 Years

Shirley Neidel

San Jose

 40 Years

Marilyn Burn

Woodside

35 Years

Charles Johnston

Alameda

1972 914

Daniel Macdonald

Novato

1959 356A

 25 Years

William Kinst

Cupertino

1970 914/6

Sergio Meza

Dublin

1970 911

Edmund Ong

San Francisco

1976 911

Nancy Lee

Saratoga

1974 914

 20 Years

Rick Brown

Loomis

1980 911SC

 15 Years

Anthony Heyer

Mountain View

1989 944

Monica Kost

Pleasanton

2007 GT3 RS

 10 Years

Jim Coon

Clovis

1997 Boxster

Allan Grimm

Piedmont

1997 C2S

Mark Hutchinson

Oakland

1974 911

Robert Lawrence

Escalon

1981 911

Robert Sutton

San Francisco

1989 944

Doug Williams

Cupertino

1970 911

Lou Bell

Half Moon Bay

 

John Kloosterman

Oakland

1969 911 T

Albert Norris

San Francisco

1984 911

 5 Years

Andrew Amon

Campbell

 

Guy Apple

Palo Alto

2004 911

Heather Busby

Mountain View

 

Susan Collins

San Francisco

 

Alexander Ho

Fremont

 

Chris Meadows

Sunnyvale

 

Diane Meza

Dublin

 

Gary Simonian

Millbrae

2002 Boxster

William Thamm

San Jose

2002 Boxster

Lawrence Choy

Alameda

2005 Cayenne S

Angela Dekorte

Napa

 

Andrew Mendonsa

El Dorado Hills

1973 914

Tiffany Mendonsa

Elk Grove

 

Dirk Morris

San Carlos

1987 944

Scott Wu

Belvedere

1994 964

 
2008 Drivers' Ed & Time Trial Schedule
TT banner
  Rich Bontempi's HIGH PERFORMANCE HOUSE
 










  Sat Mar 29, '08   Ground School Round Table Pizza, Concord

  Apr 18-20, '08   Driver's Ed & Time Trial #2 Thunderhill

  Sat May 3, '08   Ground School Round Table Pizza, Concord

  May 24-25, '08   Driver's Ed & Time Trial #3 Buttonwillow

  Sat Jul 26, '08   Ground School Round Table Pizza, Concord

  Aug 16-17, '08   Driver's Ed & Time Trial #4 Thunderhill

  Sat Aug 30, '08   Ground School Round Table Pizza, Concord

  Sep 20-21, '08   Driver's Ed & Time Trial #5 Thunderhill

High Performance House
The Power Chef
NE Bike
Canton, California

--by John Celona, The Power Chef


One of the great things about living in the United States is the diversity of people and cultures, a diversity thankfully built by continued immigration.

Of course, no people in the United States are originally from here. The American Indians preceded us by somewhere between 12,000 and 29,000 years (the debate on the number continues), with most of the rest of us arriving quite a bit after that. My great grandparents on my dad's side came over from Italy, while I have to go two generations farther back on my mom's side to plot the arrivals from France, who spent a few generations in Quebec and Prince Edward Island before a few descendants found their way to the town in Massachussetts where my mom and dad found each other.

Everybody coming over to build a better life for themselves and their families. I guess that's a big part of what makes America so special as we close in on celebrating the 4th of July, that most American of holidays.

Thankfully, everybody remembered to open up restaurants and grocery stores so we all can benefit from a planet's worth of cuisine without having to get on a plane. My old neighborhood in San Francisco still has a traditional Swedish restaurant as well as chinese, japanese, thai, cambodian, italian, french, and even "California cuisine"--that most amorphous of food types.

But you don't have to live near San Francisco to enjoy these varied offerings. My present local town has excellent Afghan, Indian (Asian Indian) and Creole (french via Louisiania) restaurants, along with a truly excellent sushi restaurant run by a chinese woman and her japanese husband.

And, if you're adventurous in the kichen like I am, the grocery stores offer all the fixings for creating your world cuisine at home. Need lemon grass for some thai food? No problem: even Safeway carries it now (right next to the fava beans, actually).

Still, a trip to the local ethnic grocery store is worth it to explore the ingredients Safeway still doesn't carry. My local favorite is Marina Market in San Mateo, which offers an amazing abundance of exotic ingredients only a five minute drive from my house (along with, on the last trip, fantastic Babcock peaches for only 99¢ a pound).

Marina Market

On my last trip to the local chinese/japanese/thai/filipino/korean market
(No, I am not making that up.)

You'll notice from the some of the reviews if you follow the link that Marina Market got a lot nicer after Ranch 99 Market (who comes up with these names?) opened in nearby Foster City. Competition to be better: another great part of the American way.

I was recently at Marina Market on an expedition to find fresh wood ear mushrooms, a key ingredient for hot and sour soup and so much better fresh than dried. Naturally, while there, I got the dried lily buds (the other unusual ingredient), plus the usual stuff that goes in: bamboo shoots, tofu, green onions, and some pork (a lean and boneless pork leg roast did the trick for that). Of course, I also look for the extra crunchy vegetable ingredient to turn the soup into an entire meal. On this trip, baby bok choy did the trick.

No, my wandering was not done then. I scouted out some rice wine (sherry will do in a pinch), plus the usual staples one needs to have around for another day: black bean chili sauce, brown sushi rice, chinese red rice vinegar, and so on.

I'll fess up: I left with a roast duck also. They're great crisped up in a 450ºF degree oven on a rack for about an hour (flip it halfway through) to make the skin really crisp and remove a lot of the fat. And, yes, I was long enough at the market that dinner that night was an oven-crisped duck with steamed chinese broccoli and whole wheat chinese buns.

The next night I put together the hot and sour soup. Hope you'll give it a try.

Hot and Sour Soup

HS Soup

The Gist

Marinated pork is simmered in chicken broth and wood ear mushrooms, then finished with tofu, bamboo shoots, baby bok choy, eggs, green onions, and shrimp. Rice wine, rice vinegar, ground white pepper, and sesame oil provide the key seasonings. Noodles make the soup a complete meal.

Ingredients

20 or so dried lily buds
1.5 lbs lean pork cut into long strips
2 Tb corn starch
2 Tb soy sauce
1 Tb vegetable oil
1 lb. raw, shelled and deveined shrimp
1 tsp. salt
2 Tb rice wine (or sherry)
1 lb. firm tofu, cut into long strips
6 cups water
6 Tb. chicken stock base
4 Tb rice wine (or sherry)
4-6 oz. fresh wood ear mushrooms, cut into strips (or half that amount dried mushrooms) soaked in water)
1 lb. whole wheat linguine
2 cans sliced bamboo shoots
2 lbs. baby bok choy, separated into leaves
2 Tb. corn starch
2 Tb. flour
6 eggs, beaten
4 Tb. rice vinegar (or cider vinegar)
2 Tb. sesame oil
2 tsp. ground white pepper
1 bunch green onions, chopped

Method

Soak the lily buds in a bowl of warm water. While they're soaking, mix the pork, 2 Tb corn starch, 2 Tb soy sauce, and 1 Tb oil together and let them marinate. Mix the shrimp with 1 tsp. salt and 2 Tb. rice wine and let them marinate.

Bring the water to a boil and mix in the chicken stock base. Add the 4 Tb. rice wine, pork, wood ear mushrooms, and lily buds. While this is simmering, bring another pot of water to boil to cook the linguine.

Simmer the soup for about 10 minutes, then add the tofu, bamboo shoots (along the way, feel free to start the linguine).  When it comes to a boil, add the baby bok choy and bring back to a boil. Mix the 2 Tb. of corn starch with the 2 Tb. of flour, then add enough water to make a smooth paste, then whisk it in with a fork to thicken the soup. Turn the heat down.

Cook the linguine al dente, then drain.

Use the fork to mix the soup as you dizzle in the eggs, then turn the heat off. Add the drained linguine. Mix in the raw shrimp (there will be just enough heat in the broth to cook the shrimp perfectly). Add the 4 Tb. rice vinegar, 2 Tb. sesame oil, 2 tsp. white pepper, and the green onions.

Give it a final stir, then taste. Add more vinegar and white pepper if you  like it more hot and sour. Serve and enjoy!

Notes

Noodles aren't traditional in hot and sour soup, but I like to add them to make it a complete meal like a japanese udon dish. Feel free to use brown rice noodles or another other type of whole grain pasta that suits your fancy.

Bon appetit,
The Power Chef
Kahlers
Porsche Roads
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--by Claude Leglise, GGR Past President


Highway 58, Paso Robles to McKittrick


UC San Diego held its graduation ceremony a couple of weeks ago, so it was time to travel to Southern California to see our eldest son get his diploma. He is still on the parental payroll for the summer, but there is hope this will come to an end. The trip was an opportunity to revisit what is probably my all-time favorite Porsche Road in California. Highway 58 offers a combination of smooth curves, long straights, dramatic mountain passes and infrequent traffic that make driving a pleasure, pretty much irrespective of the price of gas.

If you are on your way south from the Bay Area, take 101 instead of Highway 5, and exit in Paso Robles. As usual when exploring Porsche Roads, have lunch and gas up in town before heading out to the good bits. Take Niblick Road east over 101 and the Salinas River, and then at the top of the hill, make a right onto Creston Road. As soon as you leave Paso behind, the housing developments are replaced by wineries and farms. In Creston, the Windfall Farms and their extensive horse installations seem right out of Kentucky.

At the intersection with Highway 41, go straight on to La Panza Road. This road is wide and fast. Watch out for farm vehicles and bicyclists. After 10 miles, La Panza meets Calf Canyon, and you are now on Highway 58.

(For those readers with some knowledge of the German language, "La Panza" is not a female armored vehicle, but rather the small mountain range east of Santa Margarita. The Salinas River starts there and flows northward all the way to Moss Landing, where it ends up in the Pacific Ocean.)

 RJuly1

Highway 58 first goes over the La Panza range, with its typical coastal landscape of oak trees, tall grasses and yellow rocks. The pavement is in great shape, the visibility is good and the sweepers are smooth. This section is a real treat, but it is only the beginning of a great road. About 50 miles from Paso Robles, the road enters the Carrizo Plain, originally the El Chicote Spanish land grant, the largest single native grassland remaining in the State. In the old days, its remoteness made it a perfect hiding area for bandits, and to this day there are no gas stations, no store, no restrooms, no lodging -- nothing, except for a few cattle ranches and a public school. As the highway enters the plain, the straight-aways run flat across the grasses, until you get to two sharp turn signs with 15 mile per hour limits. If your normal expectation is that you can corner at twice the posted number, you are in for a major surprise. These are 90 degree corners, off camber and full of gravel.

Past the "town" of Simmler -- population too small to count - is the roller coaster section of the trip. Rather than grade the road bed, Caltrans just went over the natural undulations. One particular Boxster has been known to fly in this area, but before you are tempted to see if you can get air, keep in mind that the dips are really deep and can hide very large vehicles. When I took the picture nearby, there was a Suburban between the hills. Can you see it?

RJuly2

After the roller coaster, on the western side of the plain, you arrive at the San Andreas Fault, this section of which is much studied by scientists. Highway 58 goes over the aptly named Tremblor Range and rises up to 3750 feet before descending into the Central Valley. The driving is pure mountain fun. Once again, the pavement is in superb shape, and the curves are nice and smooth. A few are very sharp, as the road follows the natural contour of the terrain. If the weather is clear, you can pull over and enjoy a great view of the Central Valley and maybe see the Santa Barbara Mountains, the Tehachapis and the Sierras in the distance.

After going around the McKittrick Summit, you head downhill all the way to Highway 33. There are a couple of stretches with outstanding visibility where, unbeknownst to you, your car might be tempted to stretch its legs.

Scale: 1∆ to 5∆
                                          Twistiness      Pavement Quality       Scenery    
Creston / La Panza Road           ∆∆∆                 ∆∆∆∆∆                  ∆∆∆∆
Highway 50                              ∆∆∆∆∆              ∆∆∆∆∆                  ∆∆∆∆

RJuly3

If you are on your way to Los Angeles, you will want to turn right on Highway 33. Time permitting, the West Kern Oil Museum, in Taft, tells the story of this oil rich area which was once covered with 7000 wooden derricks. Then in Maricopa, Highway 166 will take you through miles and miles of orchards back to the incomparable boredom of Highway 5.

RJuly4 

If LA is not on your program for this trip, stay on Highway 58 to get to Buttonwillow, famous destination for many Time-Trialers, and further east to Barstow. But that's another story.

Claude
Vineyard Specialties2
GGR Family Picnic & Concours
Announcing

 GGR's First Annual Family Picnic / Peoples Choice Wash and Shine Concours

Join your fellow Porsche enthusiasts Sunday July 27th at Vasona County Park for this year's premier social event!!  

                   Vasona park

The event will feature a delicious BBQ lunch catered by Armadillo Willy's, a People's Choice Wash and Shine Concours, Games, and more!!  Best of all the price is only $20 per adult with children free!! 

Armadillo Willy's Lunch will include Real Texas BBQ Ribs, Smoked BBQ Chicken, Smoked Texas Beef Brisket, BBQ Beans, Potato Salad, Green Salad, Soft Drinks and Desert!!

Time is running out! Register early so you don't miss this important event!

When:   Sunday,  July 27th, 2008
            10:00 AM to 4:00 PM

Where:  Vasona County Park, Circle Group Area
             333 Blossom Hill Road
             Los Gatos, CA 95032

Price:    Adults $20.00
             Children Free!!

Note: There is also a Vasona Park Fee of $6.00 per vehicle payable at the gate.

To attend, mail your check payable to PCA-GGR to:

             Mark Powell, PCA-GGR Social Director
             P.O. Box 23038
             San Jose, CA 95153-3038

Please include:

Your name:______________________________________________

e-mail address __________________________________________

Year and Model Car _____________________________________

Number of Adults________________________________________

Number of Children______________________________________

We need a final headcount one week in advance, so registration must be postmarked no later than July 17th.  We also need volunteers to help organize and run the event.  If you would like to help or if you would like more information on the event, please email Mark Powell.

vasona map
Enter for the Carolina Trophy
September Means More Porsches In The Carolina Mountains!

--by Paul Misencik, Metrolina Area PCA, Huntersville, NC

For the past four years now, I've been organizing and running an event every September called "The Carolina Trophy," which is a five-day, European-style vintage motorcar road rally in the spirit of the Mille Miglia and Rallye des Alpes.  The event is based out of Lake Lure, North Carolina and covers 1000km over five days on some of the most sinewy and serpentine roads anywhere.  As a loyal Porsche owner and enthusiast, it warms my heart that the best-represented marque every year is Porsche, and 2008 appears to be no exception!

Carolina

Although registration is still in its early stages, we already have a four-cam 356 Carrera GS entered, a stunning 911SC RS rally replica (in Rothman's livery), two 1955 Speedsters, three 356 coupes, and two early 911's.  In addition, we have vintage Ferraris, Jaguars, Aston Martins, Austin-Healeys, and Alpine-Renaults coming from all over the United States, Canada, and even abroad!  By the time the field is set, I feel certain we'll have everything from thundering Corvettes to snarling MG's taking the starting line.

Although the Carolina Trophy is technically a "competitive" event, every stage takes place on open public roadways at legal speeds.  Each car is piloted by a driver and a navigator, and the rally is timed and scored using a combination of TSD stages and regularity legs, with ample transition stages mixed in to make ensure teams have plenty of time to relax and enjoy the roads and scenery.  Some of our entrants take the competitive side of the rally very seriously indeed, while others don't compete and merely enjoy the routes at whatever pace they choose.  Regardless, the event is set up to make sure the spirit of adventure, camaraderie, and gentlemanly competition is accessible to every entrant.

Virtually all-inclusive, the Carolina Trophy is set in gracious accommodations and includes meals, beverages and many cocktails, with social events from start to finish that make up a significant portion of the event's appeal.  By day, entrants are charging through the mountains and competing against the clock, but lunches and evenings are invariably chances for teams to connect with on another, relive the adventure of the day, and tell fish stories about cars and other topics with a group of passionate, like-minded enthusiasts.

If you love cars, I urge you to come out and experience the 2008 running of The Premier Financial Services Carolina Trophy, which takes place September 14-19, 2008.  All vehicles built in 1980 or earlier are eligible to compete, with a "special interest" class available to cars of particular interest built later than that date.  We also love to have spectators, we always need volunteers, and unique and affordable sponsorship opportunities exist for forward-thinking companies, so come on out and enjoy the action!

Complete details can be found at www.carolinatrophy.com, or call (704) 351 2087 and ask for Paul!  See you in September!
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Zone 7 Gimmick Rally
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Concours in Paradise
Concours Paradise
Zone Autocrosses #4 and #5
Marina AX
PCA Raffle
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Whew. We've made it through July. Happy 4th of July! Have a hotdog for me (with a whole wheat bun, please!).

As always, thanks for reading.
John Celona
Porsche Club of America-Golden Gate Region
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Porsche Club of America--Golden Gate Region | Nugget Headquarters | 505 Vista Ave | San Carlos | CA | 94070
Begin forwarded message:

From: John Celona <nugget-ed@sbcglobal.net>
Subject: From Porsche Club of America--Golden Gate Region
Date: July 30, 2008 6:35:26 PM PDT